Please Hate These Things and the ugly side of interior design

Please Hate These Things and the ugly side of interior design

Giulia Guido · 1 year ago · Design

Let’s face it, we’re all a bit obsessed with Home Design and every time there’s a change in the house (ours or others) we suddenly become interior designers as if this wasn’t a real profession, but more of an innate gift.

The American designer Dina Holland is not of the same idea and shows us with an Instagram profile that sometimes the opinion of an expert is not only recommended but strictly necessary.
The profile in question is Please Hate These Things, which I invite you to visit, trust me it will be really worth it, because once opened you will not manage not to browse the entire gallery of more than 500 images, coming to an end with tears in your eyes from how much you’ve laughed.

Dina collects the worst examples of Interior and Home Design ranging from the worst bathrooms to the excesses of decorations and phallic shapes, to the wrong or useless structural choices.

The bio profile @pleasehatethesethings reads Absurd, ugly & just plain stupid things in home design and could not be apter.

 

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Please Hate These Things and the ugly side of interior design
Design
Please Hate These Things and the ugly side of interior design
Please Hate These Things and the ugly side of interior design
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Freddy Mamani’s architectures look like toys

Freddy Mamani’s architectures look like toys

Claudia Fuggetti · 1 year ago · Design

Freddy Mamani is a Bolivian architect active since 2005 in the city of La Paz, where he has created works characterized by an extremely colorful style where the buildings seem to belong to a technicolor-oneiric world made of toy houses. The suburban part of the city, El Alto, was initially a destination for desperate people who sought fortune in the metropolis from the countryside and all the houses in this area had exposed bricks.

Over time the area has become the new middle-class zone, which has also sought architecture to affirm the status of those who managed to build a future from nothing. As always, architecture is the mirror of culture and complex relationship between man and city: it is impossible not to notice these opulent, colorful and singular houses.

Freddy has created a stylistic code which contrasts with minimalism, showing another face of modernity. Discover his works in our gallery.

Le architetture di Freddy Mamani sembrano giocattoli | Collater.al Le architetture di Freddy Mamani sembrano giocattoli | Collater.al  Le architetture di Freddy Mamani sembrano giocattoli | Collater.al  Le architetture di Freddy Mamani sembrano giocattoli | Collater.al Le architetture di Freddy Mamani sembrano giocattoli | Collater.al Le architetture di Freddy Mamani sembrano giocattoli | Collater.al  Le architetture di Freddy Mamani sembrano giocattoli | Collater.al Le architetture di Freddy Mamani sembrano giocattoli | Collater.al

Freddy Mamani’s architectures look like toys
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Frank Moth and the collages between real and surreal

Frank Moth and the collages between real and surreal

Giulia Guido · 1 year ago · Design

We’ve talked about digital collages many times and for a long time. Overlaps made with computers or tablets that create dialogues between different, distant worlds, irreconcilable styles, and unthinkable ideas. Among the various artists who devote themselves to this art, Frank Moth stands out, arriving to be published in some of the best newspapers in the world and to be acclaimed by critics.

Though it doesn’t sound like it, Frank Moth is the stage name for not one, but two Athens-based creatives whose work takes us on a journey to the impossible. The elements they use and reuse, without ever falling into banality, are the unknown, the unknowable, so the faces of their characters are always covered, hidden, and the boundaries, the limits, not only the geographical ones but also those of the imagination, of the thinkable.

So, in a way that even we can’t explain ourselves, we can also identify with a couple who, in the silence of space, admire the Earth.

Discover all Frank Moth’s works on his website and on his Instagram profile.

frank moth | Collater.al frank moth | Collater.al frank moth | Collater.alfrank moth | Collater.al frank moth | Collater.al frank moth | Collater.al frank moth | Collater.al

 

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Karim Rashid and his timeless collection for Krosno

Karim Rashid and his timeless collection for Krosno

Claudia Fuggetti · 1 year ago · Design

Karim Rashid is a 1960s Egyptian industrial designer with a prolific career behind him who recently made his timeless collection of glasses and utensils for Krosno. The collection has been called Sakred and goes to form the first series within the new sub-brand Krosno D’sign, the manufacturer of glass items that invites “best-known creators of global design” to work this material in a creative way.

Rashid’s designs are minimal and geometric, and they characterize objects with a strongly squared cut, combining shapes in various ways to transform a series of everyday tools into ornaments. As the artist states:

“I believe in simplicity, and above all in the functional and democratic objects of everyday life”.

The set also consists of a carafe, two bowls, and vases of different sizes, a candelabra and a cake plate with a lid, although the highlight is the glasses, including those specific for wine, champagne, and cocktails. Each item has been designed giving the right balance between design and functionality and presents vibrant colors such as green, yellow, blue, pink and purple. All the photos were taken by Tomek Albin.

To find out more you can visit the Krosno website, which you can find here.

Karim Rashid e la sua timeless collection per Krosno | Collater.al Karim Rashid e la sua timeless collection per Krosno | Collater.al Karim Rashid e la sua timeless collection per Krosno | Collater.al Karim Rashid e la sua timeless collection per Krosno | Collater.al Karim Rashid e la sua timeless collection per Krosno | Collater.al Karim Rashid e la sua timeless collection per Krosno | Collater.al Karim Rashid e la sua timeless collection per Krosno | Collater.al Karim Rashid e la sua timeless collection per Krosno | Collater.al

Karim Rashid and his timeless collection for Krosno
Design
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PAN Treetop Cabins, a modern cabin in the Norwegian woods

PAN Treetop Cabins, a modern cabin in the Norwegian woods

Giulia Guido · 1 year ago · Design

Espen Suvernik has literally surpassed itself by creating the PAN Treetop Cabins of tree houses, but without trees.

The cabins designed by the Norwegian architectural studio are, in fact, real huts built at a height of 6 metres, but instead of leaning on branches, they are supported by a complicated metal scaffolding.

The shape of these cabins was inspired by three different sources, the first are the typical huts of the Indians of North America, the second are the classic towers that overlooked the forests and used during the dry seasons and the last, and most interesting and original, are the houses inhabited by Moomin in the illustrated books by Tove Jansson. 

The cabins, which can be reached by an enormous spiral staircase, measure 40 square metres each and offer every type of comfort, from the heated floor to the bathroom with shower, ending with a loft with a double bed and another four beds. 

Discover the beauty of the PAN Treetop Cabins on the Instagram profile. 

PAN Treetop Cabins | Collater.al
PAN Treetop Cabins | Collater.al
PAN Treetop Cabins | Collater.al
PAN Treetop Cabins | Collater.al
PAN Treetop Cabins | Collater.al
PAN Treetop Cabins | Collater.al
PAN Treetop Cabins | Collater.al
PAN Treetop Cabins | Collater.al
PAN Treetop Cabins | Collater.al
PAN Treetop Cabins | Collater.al
PAN Treetop Cabins | Collater.al
PAN Treetop Cabins | Collater.al
PAN Treetop Cabins, a modern cabin in the Norwegian woods
Design
PAN Treetop Cabins, a modern cabin in the Norwegian woods
PAN Treetop Cabins, a modern cabin in the Norwegian woods
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