Simone Rotella and his dystopian illustrations

Simone Rotella and his dystopian illustrations

Collater.al Contributors · 1 month ago · Art

Simone Rotella is an Italian graphic designer and illustrator who lives his life between London and Turin.
What made him knew was the publication of his works in newspapers such as Corriere della Sera and on more complex projects such as the book “For the Gods of Girsu”, written by an archaeologist for the British Museum in London.

Thanks to his outstanding creativity, he has won numerous illustration awards such as the WIA-World Illustration Awards 2019 and the 3×3 Awards 2018, in which he received an honorable mention.
His inspiration and approach allow him to represent different themes and convey them in different formats: from archaeological books to children’s illustrations and stories. Some of his works are also inspired by street art – his first love, born during his childhood – and artists like Blu, Alessandro Gottardo “Shout”, Dran and Niels Shoe.

His illustrations are characterized by a dreamlike look that transforms reality into a credible but alienating possibility and that forces us to find a personal key to interpreting the enigma. It almost seems to approach a philosophical strand that is the basis of all his complex work.
In fact, each of his works is very conceptual and has a strong reference to vintage through the combination of different elements such as the silhouette, textures and graphic filters.
The aim of his art is to attract the attention of the observer and stimulate a retrospective and inner thought given by the dialogue between images and visual sensations.
His style is well recognizable because he manages to reconcile spontaneity, on the one hand using, a freehand stroke and on the other hand the control, awareness and all the possibilities that digital offers.
All his works are made according to certain chromatic palettes that make them almost like real paintings.

Simone finds inspiration by the comics of which he is a great fan, particularly those of Hugo Pratt, Crepax and Sergio Toppi, and by art, preferring the French painter Henri Matisse, one of the most famous artists of the twentieth century and the greatest exponent of the artistic movement of the Fauves. He admires the meticulous use of colors and their combinations.
In addition to his previous collaborations, the Turin illustrator will open his first exhibition entitled “hashtag” where he will exhibit all his most ambitious works.

Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral3
Simone Rotella | Collateral5
Simone Rotella | Collateral3

Testo di Anna Cardaci

Simone Rotella and his dystopian illustrations
Art
Simone Rotella and his dystopian illustrations
Simone Rotella and his dystopian illustrations
1 · 25
2 · 25
3 · 25
4 · 25
5 · 25
6 · 25
7 · 25
8 · 25
9 · 25
10 · 25
11 · 25
12 · 25
13 · 25
14 · 25
15 · 25
16 · 25
17 · 25
18 · 25
19 · 25
20 · 25
21 · 25
22 · 25
23 · 25
24 · 25
25 · 25
Berlin, Visions in Motion celebrates the fall of the wall

Berlin, Visions in Motion celebrates the fall of the wall

Collater.al Contributors · 1 month ago · Art

It was exactly on 9 November 1989 that the Berlin Wall was pulled down. Its fall was significant both for Germany and for the whole world. From its inception, it symbolised the separation of a nation and the differences between people, ideologies and politics.
But let’s take a step back almost sixty years: The Wall was considered the concrete symbol of the imaginary borderline between the pro-western European areas. It surrounded West Berlin and divided the city in two for 28 years, from August 13, 1961 until November 9, 1989, when the East German government was forced to declare the reopening of the borders with the Federal Republic.

The foundations of the wall were erected almost overnight. Around midnight on 13 August, army officers rolled miles of barbed wire through the city to the outlying countryside. This event became known as the “Barbed wire Sunday”. Although the complex process of physical and ideological reunification of the country took about a year in total, November 9 is considered a reference day. To celebrate this anniversary, Los Angeles-based artist Patrick Shearn – renowned for his large kinetic installations that he calls “Skynets” – was commissioned to create a commemorative work for this date.
The commissioned work continues the dynamic series of ultra-light floating art installations, mounted in such a way as to appear as floating in mid-air.
The name of the installation is Visions in Motion and was exhibited to the public from 4 to 10 November and The Brandenburg Gate in Berlin was chosen as the host location as it had previously been used as a dividing line.

The kinetic work covers an area of about two thousand square meters and thirty thousand partially reflecting ribbons that give movement thus decorating the city. The colours of the ribbons are yellow, light blue/blue and purple. The choice of the use of these shades was not a coincidence but studied as they recall and convey the idea of hope and the possibility of change, improvement, progress but also the memory of the Cold War.
Developing historical awareness is the first objective of this installation to ensure that nothing is forgotten and to prevent what happened in the past from being repeated in the future.

Visions in Motion | Collateral2
Visions in motion | Collater.al
Visions in motion | Collater.al
Visions in motion | Collater.al
Visions in motion | Collater.al
Visions in Motion | Collateral2

Visions in Motion | Collateral2

Text by Anna Cardaci

Berlin, Visions in Motion celebrates the fall of the wall
Art
Berlin, Visions in Motion celebrates the fall of the wall
Berlin, Visions in Motion celebrates the fall of the wall
1 · 16
2 · 16
3 · 16
4 · 16
5 · 16
6 · 16
7 · 16
8 · 16
9 · 16
10 · 16
11 · 16
12 · 16
13 · 16
14 · 16
15 · 16
16 · 16
WRDSMTH, when the word becomes street art

WRDSMTH, when the word becomes street art

Claudia Fuggetti · 4 weeks ago · Art

WRDSMTH is the name of an emerging author, screenwriter, former advertising copywriter and street artist: yes, we’re talking about one person. Born and raised in the Midwest, he moved to Los Angeles and started working in Hollywood, following the great American dream.

Over time, the artist has identified his style as a perfect mix of past and present. WRDSMTH has defined his art as “a unique combination of stenciling and wheatpasting”, a technique that has allowed him to make his mark not only on the walls of Los Angeles but also on those of various parts of the world.

The thoughts and messages become indelible as if to put a fixed point within a world that is constantly changing and that does not guarantee any certainty.

Follow WRDSMTH on Instagram.

WRDSMTH è il nome di un artista poliedrico di Los Angeles che scrive sui muri pensieri e parole indelebili. Dai un'occhiata alla nostra gallery!
WRDSMTH, when the word becomes street art
Art
WRDSMTH, when the word becomes street art
WRDSMTH, when the word becomes street art
1 · 18
2 · 18
3 · 18
4 · 18
5 · 18
6 · 18
7 · 18
8 · 18
9 · 18
10 · 18
11 · 18
12 · 18
13 · 18
14 · 18
15 · 18
16 · 18
17 · 18
18 · 18
Factourism, facts and curious anecdotes become original illustrations

Factourism, facts and curious anecdotes become original illustrations

Giulia Guido · 4 weeks ago · Art

Did you know that iPhones are dirtier than the toilet seat? And that, on average, an IKEA Billy bookcase is sold every 5 seconds? 

If you’re always looking for curiosities and strange and unusual anecdotes then Factourism is for you, but we’re going step by step. 

Factourism is a site that was born in 2018 with a single intent, that of telling “real facts from the real world with real sources” through funny images and cartoons with a strong impact. 

The site is the work of the Copenhagen-based infographic agency Ferdio, which every day tries to turn information into images and stories. 

The most interesting aspect of Factourism and the reason why I suggest you not only look at their Instagram profile but also go to the site is that each illustration is accompanied by the source, often renowned newspapers and magazines. In this way, even the most skeptical, those always ready to dispel and give their opinion, will have to give in to the evidence. 

In our gallery, you will find a selection of images. 

Factourism | Collater.al
Factourism | Collater.al
Factourism | Collater.al
Factourism | Collater.al
Factourism | Collater.al
Factourism | Collater.al
Factourism | Collater.al
Factourism | Collater.al
Factourism | Collater.al
Factourism | Collater.al
Factourism | Collater.al

Factourism, facts and curious anecdotes become original illustrations
Art
Factourism, facts and curious anecdotes become original illustrations
Factourism, facts and curious anecdotes become original illustrations
1 · 22
2 · 22
3 · 22
4 · 22
5 · 22
6 · 22
7 · 22
8 · 22
9 · 22
10 · 22
11 · 22
12 · 22
13 · 22
14 · 22
15 · 22
16 · 22
17 · 22
18 · 22
19 · 22
20 · 22
21 · 22
22 · 22
Traces, The Krank installation with 500 trash bags

Traces, The Krank installation with 500 trash bags

Giulia Guido · 4 weeks ago · Art

More and more often we find ourselves reading disconcerting news about the situation of our Planet. The problems are many, climate change, the extinction of entire animal species, pollution, the accumulation of waste. We have dozens and dozens of data available, on how much we consume, how much we recycle, how much time we have before the situation becomes irrecoverable, but these are numbers that are difficult to concretely visualize. 

This is why The Krank, a Greek artist who lives and works in Berlin, has decided to show, through a truly suggestive installation, how much waste we produce and cannot recycle. The work is called Traces and was set up in the X LANE cultural center, during the Graphic Days #14 exhibition held in October. 

The entire floor of one of the building’s halls was covered with 500 black trash bags. A sense of bewilderment pervades the viewer who, used to seeing a maximum of ten bags together, is completely surrounded by them. In addition, the installation is also illuminated by red lights, to give a further sense of imminent danger. 

Traces by The Krank makes us think, soon the streets of our cities, the beaches, the parks could have the appearance of this installation. We hope not.  

the krank traces | Collater.al 2
the krank traces | Collater.al 2
the krank traces | Collater.al 2
the krank traces | Collater.al 2
the krank traces | Collater.al 2
the krank traces | Collater.al 2
the krank traces | Collater.al 2
the krank traces | Collater.al 2
Traces, The Krank installation with 500 trash bags
Art
Traces, The Krank installation with 500 trash bags
Traces, The Krank installation with 500 trash bags
1 · 9
2 · 9
3 · 9
4 · 9
5 · 9
6 · 9
7 · 9
8 · 9
9 · 9