Art Wood becomes soft in Tung Ming-Chin’s sculptures
Artsculpture

Wood becomes soft in Tung Ming-Chin’s sculptures

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Giulia Guido
Tung Ming Ching | Collater.al

It’s an illusion, the one that Tung Ming-Chin manages to create using only wood because his sculptures play so much with our perception that we’d like to touch them to see if they really are what we’re looking at.

These are sculptures that do not have a precise shape, they seem almost abstract, but then, by approaching and studying them carefully we can see something more defined. A face, a hand, a foot or any other part of the body. 

Tung Ming-Chin seems to imprison people within his works, but they try in every way to free themselves, pushing strongly outwards. The art of the Taiwanese sculptor seems, in some way, to marry the thought of Michelangelo who said “every block of stone has a statue within itself and it is the task of the sculptor to discover it”, but in this case it is the wood that hides the form. 

In addition, Tung Ming-Chin succeeds in what few are successful at, namely giving a new consistency to a material, making the wood almost malleable. 

Tung Ming Ching | Collater.al
Tung Ming Ching | Collater.al
Tung Ming Ching | Collater.al
Tung Ming Ching | Collater.al
Tung Ming Ching | Collater.al
Tung Ming Ching | Collater.al
Tung Ming Ching | Collater.al
Tung Ming Ching | Collater.al
Tung Ming Ching | Collater.al
Artsculpture
Written by Giulia Guido
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