Watch a preview of “Tè verde”, the new video of Cecilia

Watch a preview of “Tè verde”, the new video of Cecilia

Emanuele D'Angelo · 3 years ago · Art

Grown up in an endless journey between soul and the great Italian classics, today Cecilia, a special artist we fell in love with at first listening, returns to visit us.

After the closing of the chapter “?”, debut EP of the young artist that has remained impressed as one of the most interesting discographic steps in the affirmation of the new Italian R&B, now comes “Tè verde”, a song capable of transforming a moment of routine afternoon in an intense but delicate emotional explosion.

But before delving into the new work of the young artist, here is the video of “Tè verde” exclusively for Collater.al Mag.

Watch the video of “Tè verde”

There are people who represent home, apologies, the magic of love that persists and resists silently, beyond the passage of time. The new single tells all this, with the help of neo-soul sounds gently shaken by electronic hints and the warmth of Cecilia’s voice, capable of making special everything she touches.

A mixed track that manages to carry a baggage full of memories that will make you feel safe. A bit like those flavors of a green tea that everyone needs sooner or later, or maybe right now, enjoy!

Read also: Vinilica vol. 69 – Cecilia

Photo credits: Arianna Angelini

Watch a preview of “Tè verde”, the new video of Cecilia
Art
Watch a preview of “Tè verde”, the new video of Cecilia
Watch a preview of “Tè verde”, the new video of Cecilia
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Milan is the background for “(T)rap&Architecture”, the project by Triennale

Milan is the background for “(T)rap&Architecture”, the project by Triennale

Giulia Guido · 3 years ago · Art

Yesterday we presented “(T)rap&Architecture”, the Triennale event powered by adidas Originals that will be streamed on Friday 16 April at 6 pm on the website and YouTube channel of Triennale Milano.

“(T)rap&Architecture” will be a digital talk that will see Bianca Felicori, curator of the entire project, discussing with Frah Quintale, Rkomi and The Night Skinny and reflecting on issues related to the city of Milan, the evolution that it has had over the years and how it will be in the future, but also on the deep bond that has always united the genres of trap and rap and the urban context. Topics already well known to the curator.

Architect, researcher and author for several Italian newspapers, Bianca Felicori in 2019 gives life to “Forgotten Architecture”, a platform where the focus is on lesser-known architecture around the world. In a short time, this project turns into a real archive of almost forgotten but always fascinating places, which has become a main resource for her independent works and collaborations.
At the same time, his research focuses on the relationship between architecture and other disciplines, first and foremost rap and trap music.

As well as exploring this theme, the talk also offers the possibility of discovering or rediscovering places in the city of Milan, from the suburbs to the central districts, both through the stories of Frah Quintale, Rkomi and The Night Skinny, but above all thanks to photographic and video documentation created specifically for the event.

The lens of Marco Aurelio Mendia, a photographer who has always been attracted to the urban landscape, and the camera of Van Khokhlov, a filmmaker specialising in advertising, followed the three protagonists to some of Milan’s iconic locations, where architecture is the main feature and characterises areas and neighbourhoods.

Curious to know how a project like “(T)rap&Architecture” is born, we asked Bianca Felicori a couple of questions, and to prepare ourselves even better for the event on Friday 16, we asked Marco Mendia and Van Khokhlov to explain some aspects of their work.

BIANCA FELICORI

How did you start your research project and what made you particularly passionate about the relationship between architecture and rap and trap music?

There are many reasons why I started this research project, but if we want to be concise we can say that it perfectly combines who I was and who I am into a single theme. When I was very young (eleven years old more or less) I started to approach Italian rap and then American hip hop (a reverse path, in short). Being born in Bologna, I felt very close to the scene of my city, at the time dominated by PMC-Porzione Massiccia Crew, but I also followed the Milanese and Roman scene in particular. Growing up and enrolling in high school, I realised how paternalistic an attitude towards this culture and its derivations really was. There was a sort of classist view and it was considered as a musical genre only suitable for those who lived in socially marginalised contexts. Which is absurd to think about today. Over the years, after enrolling in the faculty of architecture in Milan, I developed a personal awareness of the subject, I grew up and realised how much part of my cultural background could be read in relation to what I had become, an architect, a researcher and an author. This is where my interest in architecture used as a background in music videos was born and developed over time, becoming a pretext for establishing a political, anthropological and social debate on the city and our culture.

Why do you think it is important to pursue this discourse and what feedback have you received from those who have followed you so far?

I am privileged, the daughter of people who have built themselves up ‘from scratch’ as professionals and as parents. I am proud of the hard work they have done to achieve certain goals. The theme of social redemption is central for me today and is also central to this project. I believe that, in addition to the interest aroused by the idea of bringing a transdisciplinary experiment of this kind into a context such as the Triennale Milano, many of the people interested in the project also subscribe to the founding idea that I always try to make explicit. Moreover, this project will allow the artists’ audience to be reached and involved in a cultural environment. Vice versa, the artists will have the opportunity to read their work in relation to urban and architectural themes that are often considered disconnected from their reality.

MARCO AURELIO MENDIA

The architecture and landscape of the city are not unknown subjects to you. In fact, for years your artistic research has been based on street photography and exploration of the metropolis, starting from the world of graffiti artists and moving on to photographing from the rooftops and capturing the city’s skylines. Trap&Architecture focuses on the relationship between Milan’s architecture and music, how is this link reflected in your shots?

You could say that the projects are more similar than they seem, graffiti and urban exploration. The question I asked myself during the research is whether it is the person who exploits and contaminates his surroundings or the architecture itself that influences the person who exploits the corner of the city he is most attached to and grew up in. Personally, I think it’s a good mix: for example, some of the stories told through music are about the contexts in which the artists grew up, which inspired them, which contributed to their personal growth.My interest has always been to tell this subtle connection between man and urban context, whether it’s graffiti in underground tunnels, or rooftops overlooking skylines. It has always fascinated me to see how aseptic concrete can become a container for ideas and a source of inspiration on a multidisciplinary level.

What are the most difficult elements to calibrate and study in order to create shots in which the protagonist is as important as the surrounding environment?

Certainly in the design phase, that of combining two different languages, trying to tell the story of these architectural elements in the right way and giving the subject a voice.
Then in the realisation of the content, of the shots, it was very natural. I found a strong synergy between the selected places and the artists, just like a tailor-made photographic backdrop.

VAN KHOKHLOV 

Your work as a filmmaker started with your passion for skateboarding and then specialised in adverstising, especially in the world of fashion. Trap&Architecture, on the other hand, is a project that combines architecture and music, how did you approach this work? What was it like working with Frah Quintale, Rkomi and The Night Skinny?

I’ve always been fascinated by architecture, ever since I was a skate filmmaker. We would go everywhere, most of the time on the street, and you would find buildings with absurd constructions. In this project I found the me of those years and it was cool to put it all together. With Frah and the other guys there was an immediate understanding, many of them come from the same background as me and we understood each other immediately.

How did you manage to create a work in which the focus is on architecture without taking away space from the three protagonists?

Generally, you have to remember to insert the figures carefully into the architectural spaces: all you need is a little bit of handwork and the basics of composition. The rest is pure taste and imagination.

Milan is the background for “(T)rap&Architecture”, the project by Triennale
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Milan is the background for “(T)rap&Architecture”, the project by Triennale
Milan is the background for “(T)rap&Architecture”, the project by Triennale
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The Flying Hotels by Matthias Jung

The Flying Hotels by Matthias Jung

Giulia Guido · 3 years ago · Art

About three years ago we first talked about Matthias Jung, when we were fascinated by his series of works in which various buildings float in the sky over abandoned environments. Today we are returning to talk about him because, as he has already done, his latest series of works has stolen our hearts. 

It is entitled The Flying Hotels and this time it is the small, characteristic hotels that take flight. Coming straight from Matthias’ mind and constructed as always using the collage technique, the buildings resemble aerostats. 

This time the focus is on these strange flying architectures that stand out against brightly coloured backgrounds. It is as if Matthias Jung does not want to tell us where the hotels are going, leaving us free to travel wherever we want. 

Moreover, as the artist himself says on his website, each hotel is designed for different people. The Rosy Dream Hotel, for example, is a cool establishment for a young crowd, while the Green Pasture Hotel will attract a rather older middle-class clientele. The Orange Cake Bar is a place where (life)artists and free spirits meet. The Blue Noon Hotel, on the other hand, is for travellers who set more value on material comfort. 

What is certain is that reserving a room requires only one thing, a lot of imagination. Are you ready to travel? 

Matthias Jung | Collater.al
Matthias Jung | Collater.al
Matthias Jung | Collater.al
The Flying Hotels by Matthias Jung
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The Flying Hotels by Matthias Jung
The Flying Hotels by Matthias Jung
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“Kusama: Cosmic Nature”, Yayoi Kusama’s exhibition in NY

“Kusama: Cosmic Nature”, Yayoi Kusama’s exhibition in NY

Emanuele D'Angelo · 3 years ago · Art

Titled “Kusama:Cosmic Nature”, it is Yayoi Kusama’s new exhibition at New York’s Botanical Garden, where the artist investigates and explores her connection to nature.

The exhibition will take place mostly outdoors, in the 250 acres of the Big Apple’s Botanical Garden, which has been a U.S. National Heritage Site since 1967. Among the various works will be installations such as the “Narcissus Garden” located in the Native Plant Garden, and “the Ascension of Polka Dots on the Trees“.

But that’s not all, there will also be one of the most significant and well-known installations of the Japanese artist, the Infinity Mirrored Room, which we told you so much about a few months ago here, but which is not yet visitable for sure and will definitely open this summer.

The exhibition will be available until October 31, a unique opportunity to be enchanted once again by the creations and installations of the 92-year-old Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama.

Yayoi Kusama
Yayoi Kusama
Yayoi Kusama
Yayoi Kusama
“Kusama: Cosmic Nature”, Yayoi Kusama’s exhibition in NY
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“Kusama: Cosmic Nature”, Yayoi Kusama’s exhibition in NY
“Kusama: Cosmic Nature”, Yayoi Kusama’s exhibition in NY
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The new Christ the Redeemer statue in Encantado, Brazil

The new Christ the Redeemer statue in Encantado, Brazil

Emanuele D'Angelo · 3 years ago · Art

Strange but true, in Brazil, in Encantado, a city in Rio Grande do Su, they are building another statue of Christ that will be taller than the one of the Redeemer that dominates the city of Rio de Janeiro.

Work is underway, already last week the arms, which have a span of 36 meters and the head were laid, the project should be completed at the end of 2021.
With its 43 meters height, it will be the third tallest statue in the world, 43 meters, five more than the original that is included among the Seven Wonders of the World.

The mastermind of the project was Italian-born Adroaldo Conzatti, mayor of the town where the statue will rise but who unfortunately passed away prematurely due to Covid.
According to his vision, the new Christ the Redeemer will serve to revive tourism in the region and attract more visitors.

The statue in total cost about 300 thousand euros and was financed exclusively by private citizens and companies. Waiting for it to be completed here are the first photos of the new statue of Christ the Redeemer that will rise in Encantado.

The new Christ the Redeemer statue in Encantado, Brazil
Art
The new Christ the Redeemer statue in Encantado, Brazil
The new Christ the Redeemer statue in Encantado, Brazil
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