Woodstock: 5 performances to celebrate the 50th anniversary

Woodstock: 5 performances to celebrate the 50th anniversary

Giulia Guido · 1 year ago · Music

1969. Nixon is elected President of the United States and Gaddafi takes power over Libya, in New York homosexuals begin to demonstrate for their rights during the Stonewall riots, in London, the Beatles perform on the roof of Apple Records and Milan is shaken by the Strage di Piazza Fontana. While the Vietnam War is collecting more and more deaths, the man puts his first foot on the Moon. 

Exactly in the middle of this marasmus of events and revolutions is Woodstock, the most famous music festival of all time that for 3 days – between delays, encores, and unforeseen events, in the end, there were 4 – has united almost a million people who, intoxicated by the situation, by the wonderful music and by many amazing substances, sang at the top of their voices to the Peace and Love anthem. 

After exactly 50 years we are here to celebrate it with the 5 performances that made history. 

Richie Havens – Freedom

Woodstock officially began on August 15, 1969, a few minutes after 5:00 p.m., when Richie Havens took his place on stage. The euphoria and constant requests for an encore led Richie to close his performance by improvising a version of Motherless Child, a song that is a traditional Negro spiritual. The meaning of the title can be related both to the fact that many slave children were sold very young, becoming orphans, but also to the distance with their motherland, Africa.
So Richie Havens, accompanied by his guitar, began to repeat the word “Freedom” infinitely, marking the opening of the Festival in a striking way.

Santana – Soul Sacrifice 

Twenty-four hours later it was time for Santana and his group of the same name, which was not yet well known at the time. Just think of the fact that Santana’s first album had not yet been released, but their performance was a great success, especially that of the song Soul Sacrifice in which Santana showed the world that with the guitar was not bad at all.

The Who – My Generation 

A manifesto of an entire generation, My Generation closes the live show of The Who – who performed on the second day. A song that became a symbol of protest for a large proportion of young people at a time when they were seen as change, as something wrong.
The performance of My Generation went down in history also for its conclusion, when Pete Townshend starts to slam the guitar on stage and then throws it into the crowd.

Joe Cocker – With A Little Help From My Friends

The third and last day starts with a bang. Joe Cocker brought on stage a unique line up that decided to end with one of the Beatles‘ greatest hits, With A Little Help from My Friends. In Cocker’s version, the song written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney to be sung by Ringo Star undergoes a real rearrangement.
We are nobody to judge which of the two versions is better, we just enjoy the beauty.

Jimi Hendrix – The Star-Spangled Banner 

Last, both from our list and from the whole Festival, is Jimi Hendrix. Of his two-hour performance, we decided to mention his performance of The Star-Spangled Banner, the American anthem.
Accompanied by his electric guitar, the decision to bring the national anthem to Woodstock was a clear act of protest against the politics of the time and, of course, against the Vietnam War.

Woodstock: 5 performances to celebrate the 50th anniversary
Music
Woodstock: 5 performances to celebrate the 50th anniversary
Woodstock: 5 performances to celebrate the 50th anniversary
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Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film

Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film

Giulia Guido · 1 month ago · Art

It was February 16, 1990, when one of the most influential and emblematic contemporary artists died prematurely, ripped from life by AIDS. This year, on the occasion of the thirtieth anniversary of Keith Haring‘s death, the BBC has produced a film that retraces the artist’s story. 

Titled Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the film recounts in just under an hour and a half some of the most emblematic episodes and encounters in Haring’s life. The works are interwoven with images, interviews with Keith himself and unpublished footage from the archives of the Haring Foundation and made available to the BBC. 

Through the artist’s life is also told the New York of the 80s and 90s, the art and creativity that exploded at every corner, but also AIDS and fear. 

Keith Haring: Street Art Boy is directed by Ben Anthony and was broadcast for the first time on the BBC Two channel on July 4th, but you can watch it again on the BBC streaming site, iPlayer

This fascinating and compelling film – told using previously unheard interviews with Haring, which form the narrative of the documentary – is the definitive story of the artist in his own words. 

Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film
Art
Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film
Keith Haring: Street Art Boy, the new BBC film
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“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude

“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude

Emanuele D'Angelo · 1 month ago · Art

Inspired by the great couple Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Leon Keer, one of the most important artists in the world of anamorphic street art, has recently created “Safe House”.

His latest work presents a gift box in trompe l’oeil on the tympanum of a building.
“It is not obvious for everyone to have a roof over their head, your home is precious and gives you comfort and protection, a gift for the necessary needs of life.”

“Safe House” is a packaged house, artfully crafted with a great optical illusion is a tribute to Christo and Jeanne-Claude, it was made for MX29 Graffiti Tour 2020 organized by Ateliers du Graff.
The Dutch artist wants us to reflect on the importance of having a roof over our heads, something that we very often take for granted, but which, as he says, is fundamental.

“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude
Art
“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude
“Safe House”, Keer’s work inspired by Christo and Jeanne-Claude
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Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone

Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone

Giulia Pacciardi · 1 month ago · Art

In the heart of Trastevere, more precisely in Via delle Fratte di Trastevere, on the corner of Via dei Fienaroli, the Roman neighborhood where Ennio Morricone was born and grew up, a new mural dedicated to him stands out since yesterday.
It is the work of the prolific street artist Harry Greb, who is no stranger to this type of tribute. Over the years, in fact, he has titled walls to leading Italian figures of our times such as Alberto Sordi, Anna Magnani and Rino Gaetano.

In Greb’s vision, Morricone looks fixedly at us through his glasses, with a luminous crown resting on his head, the Academy Honorary Award in his left hand and his right hand busy mimicking the gesture of silence.

The opera dedicated to the Roman composer appeared yesterday afternoon, just a few hours after his death which shook the hearts of most.

Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone
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Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone
Harry Greb’s mural dedicated to Ennio Morricone
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Glen Martin Taylor and his reconstructed ceramics

Glen Martin Taylor and his reconstructed ceramics

Giulia Guido · 1 month ago · Art

Among the most famous and fascinating artistic techniques, the ancient Japanese art of Kintsugi undoubtedly stands out. It is a practice born from the idea of transforming an imperfection, a damage or a wound into something even more beautiful and perfect. Basically, this technique consists in repairing ceramic objects, even those of daily use such as cups and plates, using gold or cast silver to weld the shards. The final result gives the object a unique look and, what is no small thing, a much higher value than the original. It is precisely from the art of Kintsugi that the artist Glen Martin Taylor was inspired for his works. 

Like the Japanese, Glen Martin Taylor repairs ceramics of all kinds, some made by him and others bought but replacing precious metal with everyday objects, from twine threads to metal elements. 

If in Kintsugi’s art the only important part is that of repair, for the artist the act of reassembling objects is as important as that of destroying them. Through these two phases, the artist frees his emotions and confronts them by creating objects that will eventually have lost their primary purpose, but not their importance. 

Discover all the works by Glen Martin Taylor on his Instagram profile

Glen Martin Taylor and his reconstructed ceramics
Art
Glen Martin Taylor and his reconstructed ceramics
Glen Martin Taylor and his reconstructed ceramics
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