Young Designer Store, our interview with the young designer Terence Coton

Young Designer Store, our interview with the young designer Terence Coton

Collateral Crew · 4 years ago · Design

Young Designer Store is an initiative of Amazon Italia and Istituto Marangoni created to promote four of the best young talents of the Design School in Milan and their furniture and furnishing objects.

Matteo Agati, Gustavo Martini, Térence Coton e Giulio Maschiocchihave created a variety of products, all enclosed in a capsule collection in limited edition, and revised others belonging to the best brands of Italian design as Kreaton, Carlo Citterio, A4A Design, Caps, The Interior Design , Flaminia and Hands on Design.

At the Salone del Mobile, in the pavilion reserved for them for the entire fair duration, we met one of them, the designer Térence Coton with which we had a chat, some pictures and a short interview.

How did your passion for design start and how your creative process work?

Design is part of everybody’s life but for a creative person like me, to design means to act.
‘Doing’ is one of the most exciting moment of a designer. When, Finally, after a series of decisions, one unique solution
emerges from the chaos and imposes itself as it responds to all the constraints.
I have always been passionated for creative activities such as playing piano, drawing, and later doing architecture.
The possibility to bring my own palette of competencies and use it the way I want is the ultimate activity for me.
When I was younger I studied piano at the conservatory and spent many hours drawing. Later I became an architect and even
later a designer. Design gives back much faster than the other fields in my case and allows me to fully express my ideas

At first I isolate myself and start to identify my knowledge of the subject by writing words on paper, connecting them, as a sort
of mind map. Then, as much as possible, I like to avoid drawing anything for some weeks to focus on crafting a concept in my mind.
During this phase I eventually start to take a direction with a concept. At this moment I can start to draw and fill my bin with all the excess
designs that will never be. At this time I do control on internet if anything similar already exists to avoid the unpleasant.

The story behind a design is often full of anecdotes, however one story remains the same for all of my designs.
The amount of solutions left in the trash are a good indicator of the progress that I am making.
A I studied Architecture in The Netherlands and in France and Italy and studied later Design in Italy, I am
bringing together my knowledge of Dutch, French and Italian Design to create something new.

For the initiative promoted by Istituto Marangoni and Amazon you’ve created a decanter, what’s the difference between yours and the others?

Each of us created very different capsule collections. We all come from different places and have a different history that influences our design. It is not just
a question of style. A style can be borrowed, but our objects express who we are in a consistent way.

The decanter 360° is a design that is created in collaboration with Venetian artisans. It is created by using the larger glass tube that the artisan have, in order to
create to maximize the surface area of the wine in contact with the air. One bottle of wine occupies half of the base of the decanter. The neck is large enough
to ease the pouring in the decanter and out of it.
To create this shape I drew many different profiles and used a 3D software to create a 360° revolution and get its shape in 3D, after making 30 of them I decided to use it for the name. This design was a challenge both for me and the artisans that realized it but it brought us a true satisfaction as it is a great decanter for wine amateurs. It is unique and not just another beautiful object. It is a true object ready for use.

What do you think about the opportunity of selling your products on Amazon, you think it might be a good showcase for your work and your future?

This project offers to millions of people the possibility to get their hands on limited pieces of design. Not everybody is willing to run everywhere to look for this piece of design that they need. I completely embrace this opportunity because it finally provides a new alternative to a part of the market that seems doomed to belong only for an elite. The white background of each products may seem cold but is a fair representation of how democratical this project is. Each product is stripped of its context and exposed to the world.

To have such objects of design with their own Amazon window is unbelievably innovative and I am convinced that it is an excellent showcase for my creations and the future.
It is the ultimate way to speak for the younger generation that is the one ready for such practice.

Young Designer Store Terence Coton | Collater.al Young Designer Store Terence Coton | Collater.al 1 Young Designer Store Terence Coton | Collater.al 2

Young Designer Store, our interview with the young designer Terence Coton
Design
Young Designer Store, our interview with the young designer Terence Coton
Young Designer Store, our interview with the young designer Terence Coton
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Monte Immagine, Alberonero’s installation in Vallo di Nera

Monte Immagine, Alberonero’s installation in Vallo di Nera

Giulia Pacciardi · 3 weeks ago · Art

On Friday 2nd October, as part of the project “Umbria, a land that moves you”, promoted by C.U.R.A., Alberonero presented Monte Immagine, his latest temporary environmental installation, in collaboration with STUDIO STUDIO STUDIO, in Vallo di Nera.

Monte Immagine consists of five installations made with natural materials found in the surrounding woods, all concentrated within a single clearing.
Tree trunks and branches, the pillars of the works, resins and colored fabrics, dialogue openly with all the elements of the surrounding landscape, including the atmospheric agents that characterize it, the clouds first and foremost.

The environmental installation stems from Alberonero’s desire to explore and investigate the landscape of Vallo di Nera through the natural elements that make up its bond with man, placing the accent on places and symbols of the village that have now become invisible.

In my works, I try to make a practical experience of the site that leads me to be in balance without modifying it, but rather to alter it temporarily. An approach that, in the past, I shared with local workers. Here, not by chance, I met Giuseppe, a shepherd who helped me think that here I could have worked on the moods that derive from the extraordinary and solitary moments with the site

Ph Credits: Roberto Conte

Monte Immagine, Alberonero’s installation in Vallo di Nera
Art
Monte Immagine, Alberonero’s installation in Vallo di Nera
Monte Immagine, Alberonero’s installation in Vallo di Nera
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“The mute mirror”, the latest work by David De La Mano

“The mute mirror”, the latest work by David De La Mano

Emanuele D'Angelo · 3 weeks ago · Art

With his last work “Fragil” he really amazed us, (we talked about it here). We are talking about David De La Mano, a multifaceted artist who ranges from drawing to sculpture.

He recently finished his latest artwork for Vigo, Cidade De Cor, an art festival held in the city of Vigo, Galicia, Spain.

It is entitled “The mute mirror”, a beautiful and complex mural where silhouettes of human and animal figures are repeated.

As always the characters represented are imaginary men, they are simple silhouettes that walk in one direction but assume different positions.

Once again David De La Mano has given us a deep and beautiful work, rigorously in black and white, colors chosen by the artist because they are able to mark a rhythm that is sometimes circular, undulating or directed towards a single direction.

“The mute mirror”, the latest work by David De La Mano
Art
“The mute mirror”, the latest work by David De La Mano
“The mute mirror”, the latest work by David De La Mano
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The delicate artworks by paper artist Kanako Abe

The delicate artworks by paper artist Kanako Abe

Giulia Guido · 3 weeks ago · Art

Just a quick glance, Kanako Abe‘s works look like pen illustrations on a white sheet of paper. Instead, you only have to touch the surface to realize that you are far from the art of drawing.  
Kanako Abe, of Japanese origin based in Seattle, after working for a period as a costume designer and toolmaker in the San Francisco Bay Area, decided to completely change direction, dedicating herself to a centuries-old art of her country of origin. 

Kiri-e (切り絵), a word that derives from the union of “kiri” or cutting and “e” or image, is the traditional Japanese art of paper cutting. The cuttings, besides being used to decorate houses and closed places, have been used for centuries to create templates, called Ise-katagami, to decorate kimonos. 

Equipped only with paper and a precision cutter, Kanako Abe creates cut-outs that mix traditional Japanese images in which there is a strong presence of nature and typically Western subjects such as portraits and silhouettes.  

As a result, we have surreal, almost dreamlike creations, which when placed on another sheet of paper look like illustrations, but when taken in hand they reveal all their delicacy and fragility.

We have selected some of Kanako Abe’s works, but to find out more visit her Instagram profile

The delicate artworks by paper artist Kanako Abe
Art
The delicate artworks by paper artist Kanako Abe
The delicate artworks by paper artist Kanako Abe
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Present day seen through Reuben Dangoor’s illustrations

Present day seen through Reuben Dangoor’s illustrations

Giulia Guido · 2 weeks ago · Art

Born and grown up in Hackney, East London, Reuben Dangoor began drawing as a child, inspired by the creativity that he breathed in his family thanks to his father’s photographs and his mother’s paintings.

In 2015 Reuben Dangoor made a name for himself with his series of illustrations entitled “Legends of the Scene” in which he represented Skepta, Stormzy and D Double E as noblemen of the 1700s, on horseback or posing in elegant salons.
Music is not the only thing that makes the illustrator’s heart beat faster. Among his recurring subjects, we also find sport, especially soccer and especially Arsenal, a team for which Ruben is a fan.

But, there is also another very frequent subject in Reuben Dangoor’s illustrations, the so-called Britishness, the typical British character. Ruben is an Englishman who tells the British, their manias and contradictions, touching on issues related to politics and current affairs.

With simplicity and intelligence, the artist creates conceptual illustrations that are impossible not to understand and, precisely because of their direct and universal character, Instagram proved to be the right place to show them.

We have selected only some of Reuben Dangoor’s illustrations, but not to miss his next works follow him on Instagram.

Present day seen through Reuben Dangoor’s illustrations
Art
Present day seen through Reuben Dangoor’s illustrations
Present day seen through Reuben Dangoor’s illustrations
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