Young Designer Store, our interview with the young designer Terence Coton

Young Designer Store, our interview with the young designer Terence Coton

Collateral Crew · 3 years ago · Design

Young Designer Store is an initiative of Amazon Italia and Istituto Marangoni created to promote four of the best young talents of the Design School in Milan and their furniture and furnishing objects.

Matteo Agati, Gustavo Martini, Térence Coton e Giulio Maschiocchihave created a variety of products, all enclosed in a capsule collection in limited edition, and revised others belonging to the best brands of Italian design as Kreaton, Carlo Citterio, A4A Design, Caps, The Interior Design , Flaminia and Hands on Design.

At the Salone del Mobile, in the pavilion reserved for them for the entire fair duration, we met one of them, the designer Térence Coton with which we had a chat, some pictures and a short interview.

How did your passion for design start and how your creative process work?

Design is part of everybody’s life but for a creative person like me, to design means to act.
‘Doing’ is one of the most exciting moment of a designer. When, Finally, after a series of decisions, one unique solution
emerges from the chaos and imposes itself as it responds to all the constraints.
I have always been passionated for creative activities such as playing piano, drawing, and later doing architecture.
The possibility to bring my own palette of competencies and use it the way I want is the ultimate activity for me.
When I was younger I studied piano at the conservatory and spent many hours drawing. Later I became an architect and even
later a designer. Design gives back much faster than the other fields in my case and allows me to fully express my ideas

At first I isolate myself and start to identify my knowledge of the subject by writing words on paper, connecting them, as a sort
of mind map. Then, as much as possible, I like to avoid drawing anything for some weeks to focus on crafting a concept in my mind.
During this phase I eventually start to take a direction with a concept. At this moment I can start to draw and fill my bin with all the excess
designs that will never be. At this time I do control on internet if anything similar already exists to avoid the unpleasant.

The story behind a design is often full of anecdotes, however one story remains the same for all of my designs.
The amount of solutions left in the trash are a good indicator of the progress that I am making.
A I studied Architecture in The Netherlands and in France and Italy and studied later Design in Italy, I am
bringing together my knowledge of Dutch, French and Italian Design to create something new.

For the initiative promoted by Istituto Marangoni and Amazon you’ve created a decanter, what’s the difference between yours and the others?

Each of us created very different capsule collections. We all come from different places and have a different history that influences our design. It is not just
a question of style. A style can be borrowed, but our objects express who we are in a consistent way.

The decanter 360° is a design that is created in collaboration with Venetian artisans. It is created by using the larger glass tube that the artisan have, in order to
create to maximize the surface area of the wine in contact with the air. One bottle of wine occupies half of the base of the decanter. The neck is large enough
to ease the pouring in the decanter and out of it.
To create this shape I drew many different profiles and used a 3D software to create a 360° revolution and get its shape in 3D, after making 30 of them I decided to use it for the name. This design was a challenge both for me and the artisans that realized it but it brought us a true satisfaction as it is a great decanter for wine amateurs. It is unique and not just another beautiful object. It is a true object ready for use.

What do you think about the opportunity of selling your products on Amazon, you think it might be a good showcase for your work and your future?

This project offers to millions of people the possibility to get their hands on limited pieces of design. Not everybody is willing to run everywhere to look for this piece of design that they need. I completely embrace this opportunity because it finally provides a new alternative to a part of the market that seems doomed to belong only for an elite. The white background of each products may seem cold but is a fair representation of how democratical this project is. Each product is stripped of its context and exposed to the world.

To have such objects of design with their own Amazon window is unbelievably innovative and I am convinced that it is an excellent showcase for my creations and the future.
It is the ultimate way to speak for the younger generation that is the one ready for such practice.

Young Designer Store Terence Coton | Collater.al Young Designer Store Terence Coton | Collater.al 1 Young Designer Store Terence Coton | Collater.al 2

Young Designer Store, our interview with the young designer Terence Coton
Design
Young Designer Store, our interview with the young designer Terence Coton
Young Designer Store, our interview with the young designer Terence Coton
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The landscapes reflections of the photographer Victoria Siemer

The landscapes reflections of the photographer Victoria Siemer

Giulia Pacciardi · 3 years ago · Design

Hazy, uncertain, scary but romantic landscapes.
Expanses of water, swimmers and surfers.
Crumbs of stars, lights and skyscrapers.

Victoria Siemer’ world, it’s infinite.
It encompasses every landscape, every emotion and never ends.
Her work starts from the idea of the fragmentation of the self and all the feelings that revolve around this personal view of things.
A dream world, where landscapes float in the sky, create walls, turn into corners and tip upside down.

Like a magnifying glass that focuses on details that are lost, such as a space-time fractures in which the world is repeated without commas.

I paesaggi onirici riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al
I paesaggi riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al
I paesaggi riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al
I paesaggi onirici riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al
I paesaggi riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al
I paesaggi riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al
I paesaggi riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al
I paesaggi riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al
I paesaggi onirici riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al
I paesaggi onirici riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al
I paesaggi onirici riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al
I paesaggi onirici riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al
I paesaggi onirici riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al
I paesaggi onirici riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al
I paesaggi riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al
I paesaggi onirici riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al
I paesaggi onirici riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al
I paesaggi riflessi della fotografa Victoria Siemer | Collater.al

The landscapes reflections of the photographer Victoria Siemer
Design
The landscapes reflections of the photographer Victoria Siemer
The landscapes reflections of the photographer Victoria Siemer
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Goodbye Milan Design Week

Goodbye Milan Design Week

Antonio Maria Privitera · 3 years ago · Design

The curtain of the Milan Design Week 2017 falls, and a point now seems to be clear: the canonical six days of the design week – if it wasn’t clear before – are no longer enough; including new neighborhoods, events, conferences, and so on, the time is not enough.

Several are the novelties of this edition, from the Ikes Festival (closer to the design that matters) to the participation of Airbnb, through the new areas of Ventura Centrale.

Let’s start from here to tell you what we did not want to give up.

VENTURA CENTRALE is probably the real revelation; a unique space (the one of ex Magazzini Raccordati) that is returned to the city hosting the most evocative installation. Among the best the works of Luca Nichetto and Ben Gorham for Salviati. Here shapes and colors, layered and stacked in a different way, have become glass elements from the countless possibilities and gave birth to 53 Pyrae totem and 3 Strata blocks. Lee Broom celebrated ten years of activity and realized Time Machine, a white carousel with enchanted light that welcomed some pieces of the collection and hidden to a first glance the true time machine, a pendulum clock in Carrara marble (least interesting of the carousel) produced in limited series. Maarten Baas, with May I have your attention please?, delivered to Lensvelt the second consecutive Milano Design Award (Best Concept). In his theatrical installation tens of megaphones dispersed sounds surrounding some copies of the 101 Chair; a chair model in series, always the same but always different, where the seat-backs make the difference.

INVISIBLE OUTLINES was an immersion in the creative world of Nendo, designers among the most prolific in circulation that never disappoints. At Jil Sander showroom in Via Beltrami sixteen collections materialized (or dematerialized) setting the boundaries of what we perceive; from the border table that dissolve on the walls, to the jellyfish vase swaying underwater, and to the objectextile generated by the projection of 3D objects, where everything leads back to the relationship between inside and outside, visible and invisible.

FOUNDATION brought elegance inside Spazio Krizia. Major players in this design week, the Formafantasma presented their research on the world of light, seen as a subject rather than as an intangible reality, studying the basic principles of shadows, reflections, shades and projections. In addition to a selection of the Delta collection for Galleria Giustini Stagetti and a series of experiments developed by Peep-hole, it was possible to see a preview of the collaboration with the Textiel Museum in Tilburg.

S.F _ SENSES OF THE FUTURE won the Milan Design Award 2017 and, of course, was one of the installations which has been the subject of so much debate. At center stage the LG technology and its OLED screens interpreted by Tokujin Yoshioka and assembled to return from a SF side to the S.F chair, a set of chairs animated by light, and on the other Wall of the Sun, a large wall consisting of 30,000 overlapping lights on four levels with the same number of intensity. The result was a half-light space invested at times by a large glow as a symbolic presence in our future.

NEW SPRING made everyone smile. After Sou Fujimoto, this year COS has relied on Studio Swine, and the outcome was an interactive installation aesthetically perfect and in line with the H&M brand. A sculpture, a tree that flowers and leaves fall dense spheres, smoke laden, ready to dissolve in the hands of enchanted visitors; the incessant flow of the condensed nature in a moment of contemplation and collective sharing. One of those moments in which the Salone, fortunately, makes us act like kids with the desire to discover.

Arrivederci Milano Design Week | Collater.al

Arrivederci Milano Design Week | Collater.al

Arrivederci Milano Design Week | Collater.al

Arrivederci Milano Design Week | Collater.al

Arrivederci Milano Design Week | Collater.al

Arrivederci Milano Design Week | Collater.al

Arrivederci Milano Design Week | Collater.al

Arrivederci Milano Design Week | Collater.al

Arrivederci Milano Design Week | Collater.al

Arrivederci Milano Design Week | Collater.al

Arrivederci Milano Design Week | Collater.al

Arrivederci Milano Design Week | Collater.al

Arrivederci Milano Design Week | Collater.al

Arrivederci Milano Design Week | Collater.al

Arrivederci Milano Design Week | Collater.al

Arrivederci Milano Design Week | Collater.al

Goodbye Milan Design Week
Design
Goodbye Milan Design Week
Goodbye Milan Design Week
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DotPigeon, hip hop and glitch art

DotPigeon, hip hop and glitch art

Giulia Pacciardi · 3 years ago · Design

A corrupt file, twenty years ago, was synonymous of problems today, however, it has become a very attractive aesthetic reason.
One of those where many artists are venturing creating different results characterized by personal taste.

Stefano Fraone, grew up in the 90s, and of those years also feels great nostalgia, is one of them.
Stumbled by accident in the Giacomo Carmagnola work he was so fascinated that decided to try himself the glitch art, more precisely, the pixel sorting.

His DotPigeon project, however, is strongly focused on the latest trends.
Pop international music artists whose face is completely corrupt but which remain recognizable thanks to the attitude and all the elements which characterize them.
His works mix perfectly, in an explosive see-through, fashion, rap, pop culture and of course the graphic trend of the moment, the glitch art.

You can see all his works here.

DotPigeon, hip hop e glitch art | Collater.al DotPigeon, hip hop e glitch art | Collater.al 2 DotPigeon, hip hop e glitch art | Collater.al 11

DotPigeon, hip hop e glitch art | Collater.al 3 DotPigeon, hip hop e glitch art | Collater.al 9 DotPigeon, hip hop e glitch art | Collater.al 1 DotPigeon, hip hop e glitch art | Collater.al 6 DotPigeon, hip hop e glitch art | Collater.al 5 DotPigeon, hip hop e glitch art | Collater.al 7 DotPigeon, hip hop e glitch art | Collater.al 8 DotPigeon, hip hop e glitch art | Collater.al 10 DotPigeon, hip hop e glitch art | Collater.al 4

DotPigeon, hip hop and glitch art
Design
DotPigeon, hip hop and glitch art
DotPigeon, hip hop and glitch art
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Red series, the chair made of blood of Gi-Hyun Kim

Red series, the chair made of blood of Gi-Hyun Kim

Giulia Pacciardi · 3 years ago · Design

Liters and liters of blood.
Blood that is scary, creates disgust, aversion and fascinates.
It is admired for its power to give life but also take it off.

Gi-Hyun Kim, a Japanese designer, started from his personal experience and created Red Series, a special design object, similar to a bench, reminiscent of the circulatory system.
Its purpose is to experience the meaning of life, the moment of birth.
The chair, in fact, begins to act as our circulatory system when someone sits on it, pumping blood and putting it circulating through the pipes of which it is made.

Disquieting, and a little bit splatter, it’s a metaphor to emphasize how much blood it takes to give life and how to remove it.

Red series, la sedia fatta di sangue di Hyun-Gi Kim | Collater.al
Red series, la sedia fatta di sangue di Hyun-Gi Kim | Collater.al
Red series, la sedia fatta di sangue di Hyun-Gi Kim | Collater.al
Red series, la sedia fatta di sangue di Hyun-Gi Kim | Collater.al
Red series, la sedia fatta di sangue di Hyun-Gi Kim | Collater.al

Red series, the chair made of blood of Gi-Hyun Kim
Design
Red series, the chair made of blood of Gi-Hyun Kim
Red series, the chair made of blood of Gi-Hyun Kim
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