Ada installation is the perfect match between  innovation, architecture and science

Ada installation is the perfect match between innovation, architecture and science

Collater.al Contributors · 2 months ago · Art

Jenny Sabin realized Ada installation in collaboration with Microsoft research for the Redmond campus of Washington.

The pavilion is the perfect match of innovation, architecture, and science and this is why it takes the name of Ada Lovelace, the English mathematician considered one of the first computer programmers.

The totally immersive experience is made tangible through the conversion of personal data into light and colors. Data are nothing more than expressions, hidden sensations, and emotions collected through a network of sensors and cameras located all around the building, and then transferred onto the light mesh structure of tubular components.

The result is a space where protagonists are curiosity, wonder and collective exchange of emotions.

Text by Giordana Bonanno.

Ada installation is the perfect match between innovation, architecture and science
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Ada installation is the perfect match between innovation, architecture and science
Ada installation is the perfect match between innovation, architecture and science
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Vito Ansaldi and his conceptual illustrations

Vito Ansaldi and his conceptual illustrations

Giulia Guido · 2 months ago · Art

Starting from Sicily, today Vito Ansaldi lives and works in Turin and his illustrations have reached our eyes, immediately capturing our attention. 

On his website, Vito reiterates one thing: “creativity makes me feel truly free”, and we can’t blame him, on the contrary, we are a bit envious of the fact that he succeeds, to feel free. In daily life in which social networks, limits, restrictions, battles prevail, it is difficult to find what makes us happy, satisfied and much more complicated is to have the opportunity to pursue this happiness. 

Maybe that’s why Vito Ansaldi’s illustrations are a slap, colorful and perfect, that makes us open our eyes and that, in a simple and uncluttered way, shows us how many chains we are tied to, many times by our choice. In addition to being able to synthesize in an image concepts difficult to express in words, the works of Vito have the strength to get to all and to be universally understandable. 

If you like the work of Vito Ansaldi we invite you to discover those of Marco Melgrati and Pawel Kuczynski

Vito Ansaldi | Collater.al
Vito Ansaldi | Collater.al
Vito Ansaldi | Collater.al
Vito Ansaldi | Collater.al
Vito Ansaldi | Collater.al
Vito Ansaldi | Collater.al
Vito Ansaldi | Collater.al
Vito Ansaldi | Collater.al
Vito Ansaldi | Collater.al
Vito Ansaldi | Collater.al
Vito Ansaldi | Collater.al
Vito Ansaldi | Collater.al
Vito Ansaldi and his conceptual illustrations
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Vito Ansaldi and his conceptual illustrations
Vito Ansaldi and his conceptual illustrations
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Egaligilo, a project by architect Gerardo Borissin

Egaligilo, a project by architect Gerardo Borissin

Collater.al Contributors · 2 months ago · Art

At the foot of a hill in Mexico City, a pavilion with concrete walls assembled like a puzzle and marked by a series of bulbous volumes with small white circles patterned across them is revealed up among the trees.

This is Egaligilo, the pavilion designed by architect Gerardo Borissin for this year’s Design Week Mexico festival in Chapultepec Forest. “The project acts as a balance of forces between rational and parametric architecture while preserving a natural environment inside,” said the architect. The perforated wall is designed to allow sunlight, rain, and oxygen to reach the interior and maintain the microclimate necessary for a small forest.  

It seeks to raise public awareness of the recycling of ephemeral structures and the main purpose of architecture: benefit to humanity,” said Borissin.

Text by Giordana Bonanno.

Egaligilo, a project by architect Gerardo Borissin
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Egaligilo, a project by architect Gerardo Borissin
Egaligilo, a project by architect Gerardo Borissin
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Labeltime, the IG profile that collects vintage labels

Labeltime, the IG profile that collects vintage labels

Giulia Guido · 2 months ago · Art

The history of clothing labels began almost with the birth of the concept of fashion. The appearance of labels is closely linked to the value of a designer to sign his creation then, since the ’50s of the nineteenth century, these small pieces of embroidered fabric have undergone an extraordinary evolution, changing color, shape, passing from being sewn inside the garments to be applied on the outside, clearly visible to all.

Today the so-called labels no longer have that value, so much so that more and more often they are cut or detached, but only a couple of decades ago brands and boutiques were free to create the strangest and most eccentric labels possible.

In Instagram profile labeltime you can find the most beautiful, eccentric and colorful labels.

The profile made its debut in 2013 and was born from the mind of Dana Cohen, a girl from San Francisco who loves vintage clothes. Labeltime is a sort of collector of all the labels that Dana grieves while going around the markets.

In our gallery, you will find a selection!

labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
labeltime labels | Collater.al
Labeltime, the IG profile that collects vintage labels
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Labeltime, the IG profile that collects vintage labels
Labeltime, the IG profile that collects vintage labels
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Brexit illustrated by Christoph Niemann

Brexit illustrated by Christoph Niemann

Giulia Guido · 2 months ago · Art

It seems that the member states of the European Union have not been able to reach an agreement this time, so the decision on the type of postponement of Brexit has been postponed again. The more time passes, the more complicated the situation seems to be and keeping up with all the news is very difficult. Not to mention those who, unaware until now of what is happening, try to approach the subject for the first time. Let’s face it, it would take a diagram. 

That’s why the New York Times called on Christoph Niemann, one of the most famous and renowned illustrators of our times, to entrust him with the arduous task of describing the current situation of the European Union through images. 

This is how The Illustrated Guide to Brexit was born, in which Christoph combines photographs and sketches, accompanied by short captions that retrace the history of Brexit, creating interesting links with other current situations such as that between England and Ireland, but also with past events, such as the events that led to the birth of the Anglican Church. 

Christoph Niemann’s work demonstrates, once again, how art can become the perfect tool to interpret our time and make it accessible to all. 

Below are some of his illustrations, for the complete Guide go to the New York Times website

Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Christoph Niemann Brexit | Collater.al 2
Brexit illustrated by Christoph Niemann
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Brexit illustrated by Christoph Niemann
Brexit illustrated by Christoph Niemann
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