HiBed is the smart Bed 2.0 by Hi-Interiors

HiBed is the smart Bed 2.0 by Hi-Interiors

Collater.al Contributors · 4 months ago · Design

Hi-Interiors recently announced the second edition of its HiBed smart bed. So if you’re lazy you’ll have an extra excuse not to go out on the weekend and enjoy all the comforts and technology that makes this special bed available to you. Unlike its predecessor HiCan, released in 2018, it has a more minimal structure. The design was designed by Italian architect Fabio Vinella.

Going into more detail, the bed has a number of features to envy anyone. The elegant and enveloping structure offers all kinds of options, such as a 4K projector that can be combined with a series of devices to watch movies on a 70-inch screen. The speakers are inserted directly into the bed frame to give a ‘multiplex experience to all effects, but can also be used to listen to music.

HiBed also has its own lighting system to enjoy a good book or ground guide for the night. In addition to the elements for enjoyment, this bed is connected to an app and offers individual statistics for monitoring sleep and health, monitors temperature, air quality and body weight. In the morning, an intelligent audio alarm wakes the user up reciting the weather and news.

Hi-Interiors is a start-up, international in spirit but all Italian in heart, founded by two young entrepreneurs: Ivan and Gianni Tallarico. The idea behind Hi-Interiors is to bring to the world of design the disruptive force of the so-called “Internet of Things”, or interactive objects of the new generation that dialogue with the Internet. The Internet of Furniture is born.

HiBed is currently available for pre-order on the Hi-Interior website.

Text by Elisa Scotti

HiBed is the smart Bed 2.0 by Hi-Interiors
Design
HiBed is the smart Bed 2.0 by Hi-Interiors
HiBed is the smart Bed 2.0 by Hi-Interiors
1 · 6
2 · 6
3 · 6
4 · 6
5 · 6
6 · 6
Zaha Hadid Architects shapes new building in Dubai

Zaha Hadid Architects shapes new building in Dubai

Collater.al Contributors · 4 months ago · Design

A new building is born in Dubai, an imposing cube, hollow in the center, designed by Zaha Hadid Architects. Opus is the name and is located in the Burj Khalifa district. Covering an area of 84,345 square meters, the structure is divided into two distinct towers, joined together by an equally large atrium on the ground floor and by a corridor/bridge to a raised floor.

The building consists of twenty floors above and seven floors below, which were completed seven years after work began. Its peculiarity is precisely a large central asymmetrical slit, which allows you to enjoy the view and the city from the center of the structure, all contrasts sharply with the squared and geometric shape of the cube. The external structure is completely made of glass and steel, while the interiors alternate between marble and what appears to be porcelain stoneware.

The environment will host the next hotel ME by Melia Dubai Hotel, which will have a super futuristic layout including 12 restaurants, a rooftop bar and about 5200 sqm of office space.

The project expresses all the peculiarities and style of the group of architects, expressing a sculptural sensitivity that does not betray the expectations of lovers of this type of plastic and futuristic architecture. The balance between solid and void, opaque and transparent, internal and external, is reinterpreted.

Text by Elisa Scotti

Zaha Hadid Architects shapes new building in Dubai
Design
Zaha Hadid Architects shapes new building in Dubai
Zaha Hadid Architects shapes new building in Dubai
1 · 8
2 · 8
3 · 8
4 · 8
5 · 8
6 · 8
7 · 8
8 · 8
Studio Gensler has designed a pop-up pavilion for Notre-Dame

Studio Gensler has designed a pop-up pavilion for Notre-Dame

Collater.al Contributors · 4 months ago · Design

Last April, Notre-Dame Cathedral, 850 years old, was badly damaged by the tragic fire that destroyed part of one of the most famous places of worship in the world, so the Gensler studio made a temporary proposal for its future visitors.

The project involves the construction of a pavilion that will have a frame made of carbonized the wood. Duncan Swinhoe, the director of the studio, explains that “Carbonized wood, which is one of the oldest and most effective methods of protecting wood from fire, also symbolizes that what once destroyed Notre-Dame will serve to make it stronger, thus expressing a message of rebirth and transformation”.

The pavilion will be built in the square in front of it and the most important aspect is that the project is as faithful and close to the cathedral as possible. The aim is to find a balance between a structure that invites the community but that can also become a reflective and spiritual refuge for the celebration of the functions of the church. The intention is also to offer the faithful and tourists around the world a declaration of hope and rebirth.

Functioning as a protected nave, the temporary structure recalls the structural rhythms and shapes of the Gothic cathedral. With a cover made of ETFE cushions and translucent polycarbonate walls, the temporary structure will be flooded with natural light, emphasizing the ethereal quality of the space while creating a visual relief.

Behind the altar, mobile panels will be installed to provide a complete view of Notre-Dame. Gensler’s design also includes ground level rotating panels that can be positioned to open or close the edge of the structure to reflect the configuration of the cathedral for mass services or be moved to seamlessly open space for shows or as a market.

Text by Elisa Scotti

Studio Gensler has designed a pop-up pavilion for Notre-Dame
Design
Studio Gensler has designed a pop-up pavilion for Notre-Dame
Studio Gensler has designed a pop-up pavilion for Notre-Dame
1 · 10
2 · 10
3 · 10
4 · 10
5 · 10
6 · 10
7 · 10
8 · 10
9 · 10
10 · 10
Architectural photomontages by Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar

Architectural photomontages by Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar

Collater.al Contributors · 4 months ago · Design

Architect Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar has put together spectacular photomontages that combine archaeological sites in Iran with contemporary buildings by masters of architecture such as Zaha Hadid, Daniel Libeskind and Norman Foster.

His conceptual project, entitled Expanding Iranian Ancient Architecture, imagines modern buildings that intersect with ancient oriental architecture.

Famous existing buildings, such as the Libeskind Studio at the Royal Ontario Museum in Canada and the Louvre glass pyramid by Ieoh Ming Pei, overlap with pre-Islamic castles and royal palaces at UNESCO World Heritage sites in Iran. Another image, Zaha Hadid Architects’ Port House, is an extension of the cantilevered fire station on Tepe Sialk, an ancient archaeological site in Kashan. In another, the glass superstructure of Foster + Partners at the Apple Store in Hangzhou protects the remains of Takht-e-Jamshid in Fars.

Forouzanfar has combined these images to examine the tension between the visions of the past and the future and initiate a conversation on the conservation of the sites themselves. Linking architecture from the Western canon to pre-Islamic architecture was a deliberately stimulating choice for the viewer and for himself.

There is a precious legacy of the Iranian past that has become a global record. But due to neglect and lack of protection, many of these buildings have been destroyed or are in danger of being destroyed.

By creating photomontages of UNESCO-listed sites superimposed on modern reference buildings, the architect wants to highlight how Iran’s architectural heritage is neglected and wonders how it could be restored.

“The preservation and restoration of monuments are important in a country with a lot of historical heritage, and its strategies need to be constantly reviewed to find the best practices and the most up-to-date principles.
Historical monuments in Iran are eroding and decaying, and are less likely to be restored with modern methods that can derive from contemporary critical thinking.”

The use of contemporary architecture to help preserve UNESCO World Heritage sites is a delicate balance for architects. In Bahrain, Swiss architect Valerio Olgiati has built a large red concrete canopy to protect the ruins of an ancient market and provide a unique visiting experience. Why not take it as an example?

Text by Elisa Scotti

Architectural photomontages by Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar
Design
Architectural photomontages by Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar
Architectural photomontages by Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar
1 · 6
2 · 6
3 · 6
4 · 6
5 · 6
6 · 6
New Wave, recycle plastic to build a school in Mexico

New Wave, recycle plastic to build a school in Mexico

Collater.al Contributors · 4 months ago · Design

Ulf Majergren Architects (UMA) has developed a conceptual project, “New Wave”, reusing plastic bottles from the ocean to build an art school in Mexico. Recycled objects were used for the facade of the building so that a positive message could be conveyed and the local community sensitized. All this in addition to the fact that the country generates about half a million tons of plastic waste per year.

The construction simulates real plastic waves that aim to amaze passers-by and at the same time offer a stimulating environment for children, but also to remember that the bottles come from there, from the sea.

The bottles are first pierced, inserted into a folding bar, then stacked on top of each other and finally given the desired shape, in this case, of large waves. To be clearer, they are joined together as if it were a fence. The bottles near the ground are filled with cement or sand to ensure stability and each element is also attached to a wall or a sheet in mid-air.

The colors are those typical of the sea, or better, of a wave, blue-cyan-white. The structure also offers shelter from the rain and the sun and in some parts also create seats and tables. The choice to give life to such a faithful form is to raise awareness and make people reflect on how plastic is damaging our planet and how it can be reused and used in architecture.

Text by Elisa Scotti

New Wave, recycle plastic to build a school in Mexico
Design
New Wave, recycle plastic to build a school in Mexico
New Wave, recycle plastic to build a school in Mexico
1 · 4
2 · 4
3 · 4
4 · 4