“La Haine” and ’90s streetwear

“La Haine” and ’90s streetwear

Andrea Tuzio · 6 days ago · Style

Released 25 years ago, Mathieu Kassovitz‘s La Haine is one of those movies that can’t get old. Filmed in black and white, it tells the listless routine of three friends along the 19 hours during which the story develops. 

The three protagonists are Hubert, a black boxer with a strong moral code, Saïd, a naive man of Algerian origin, and Vinz, a working class Jew with a very difficult character. All born in France to immigrant parents, they live in the Parisian banlieue, constantly angry and at odds with society for the way society itself has always treated them.

Despite the time that has passed since the film’s release, La Haine seems to be more current than ever, racial and class struggles, abuse of power by the police and the contrast with the established authority with which the film is imbued, are still issues at the center of political and social debate at all latitudes and remind us how far we still have to go to change course.

In addition to the raw and direct message that Kassovitz launched with the film, Hatred was also an incredible example of the streetwerar aesthetics of the 1990s immortalizing its patterns.

The way the three protagonists are dressed is intrinsically connected to their characterization: Vinz, repressed and emotionally arid, remains all the time “closed” in his Nike trackuit. Hubert expresses his inner conflict of anger and violence by wearing different brands like Carhartt, Fila, Everlast and a shearling jacket while Saïd, a troubled, confused and lost character, wears simple garments like a Lacoste polo shirt under a no brand suit.

The overalls put under the coats, almost a sort of uniform, are a real antiluxury concept that dominates a certain type of contemporary men’s fashion.

Vintage clothing expert Kevin Soar explained: “La Haine has a resonance for its style and its political context. The film remains relevant by focusing on the relationship between the police/the government and working-class suburban youth, as there will always be a struggle between young people and the police in most big cities around the world. The consistent look between groups of people, and especially young people, is an important statement – it’s not just about looking good, but also saying ‘We are one.”

One of the most iconic images of the film is the one in which Vinz, Saïd and Hubert are immortalized on a balcony overlooking Paris: Vinz is wearing an MA-1 on a Nike suit jacket and a pair of jeans, Saïd a leather bomber jacket on a tracksuit and Hubert his classic shearling jacket, a pair of camo cargo pants and a Carhartt beanie.

Mathieu Kassovitz’s La Haine s a controversial, unique, iconic and powerful film, a raw and real look at the social difficulties we unfortunately continue to experience, but it is also a premonitory film that has managed to perfectly capture the streetwear aesthetic of the 90s, which is the main reference of contemporary fashion.

“La Haine” and ’90s streetwear
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Denise Rashidi and the coloring book about Japan

Denise Rashidi and the coloring book about Japan

Giulia Guido · 1 week ago · Art

Fernweh is one of those fantastic untranslatable words that often contain a deep meaning. In this case, Fernweh, a German word, means “longing for distance”, that is the feeling that assails us when we want to leave and go as far away from home as possible. 

At least once in our lives, especially in recent months, we have all experienced such a feeling and it is precisely from this overwhelming desire to travel that Denise Rashidi let herself be inspired for her latest work. 

Denise Rashidi is a German illustrator who, during a trip to Japan, was captivated by the beauty of the streets, the particularity of the architecture, so much so that she started drawing them. This is how Daydreaming in Japan was born: A Coloring Book and Travel Adventure, a self-published book with decision makers and dozens of views of Japanese cities and villages to color as you like. 

Obviously, Denise Rashidi also gave her personal interpretation to the illustrations, coloring them with warm, almost neon tones, turning the places into surreal, dreamlike places. 

If you love Japan and have an incredible desire to travel, Daydreaming in Japan: A Coloring Book and Travel Adventure could be your next purchase. 

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Denise Rashidi and the coloring book about Japan
Denise Rashidi and the coloring book about Japan
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“Sneakerhead”, the Netflix series for shoe enthusiasts

“Sneakerhead”, the Netflix series for shoe enthusiasts

Emanuele D'Angelo · 1 week ago · Art

Dear sneakers fans and collectors, Netflix has thought of a series just for you.
Coming out on September 25th, we are talking about “Sneakerhead” a six-episode comic series with Allen Maldonado and Andrew Bachelor, produced by creator Jay Longino.

The protagonist of the series is Devin, a dad with an incredible passion for shoes, but who left the market some time ago. His lifelong friend will convince him to dive into a business deal, definitively awakening his passion.

Waiting for its release, here is the trailer that lasts about two minutes and a half, which in a few hours has made the full consensus counting at the moment over 200,000 views on YouTube.


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The villa of “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” is on Airbnb

The villa of “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” is on Airbnb

Emanuele D'Angelo · 1 week ago · Art

It was September 10, 1990, on television a series destined to have a special place in our adolescence “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” made its debut. 30 years after that beautiful first episode that sucked us into the fantastic and colorful world of Willy, the actors organized a reunion with a very special surprise.

For the 30-year commemorative shoot of the sitcom, Smith gathered in the old mansion of Banks Tatyana Ali (Ashley), Karyn Parsons (Hilary), Joseph Marcell (Geoffrey), Daphne Maxwell Reid (Aunt Viv), Alfonso Ribeiro (Carlton) and DJ Jazzy Jeff.

In addition to announcing new episodes on HBOMax, the villa where Will Smith shot the sitcom for six years is on Airbnb.
Starting September 29, five people will have the opportunity to book one of the five stays for two people in a wing of Will’s house, available on October 2, 5, 8, 11 and 14.

Reservations are currently limited to Los Angeles Country residents, the cost per night will be only $30.
And it will be Willy himself to open “that hottie of the house“, inside you will find the same furniture of the series, an exclusive collection of sneakers and clothing of the prince used in the series.

Here is the statement released by Airbnb: “the family residence is as luxurious as it appeared in the TV series. Graffiti art, elegant interiors, timeless family portraits and Philadelphia cheese steak served on silver plates will transport you to the heart of luxury. Uncle and Aunt Banks not included.”

The villa of “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” is on Airbnb
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Alex Senna’s street art, made of people and shadows

Alex Senna’s street art, made of people and shadows

Giulia Guido · 1 week ago · Art

The first time we talked about Alex Senna we focused on the romantic aspect of his works. Now, almost 3 years later, we return to focus on the Brazilian street artist‘s work, paying attention to another aspect of his artwork that has become more and more frequent. 

Since he started, Alex Senna has been filling the cities of the world, from Brazil to Italy, from the United States to Hong Kong, with his murals depicting simple black and white characters, a stylistic choice due to the artist’s colorblindness.

These figures are represented in their everyday life and, like everyone on the street, they too walk, look around, push a bicycle or wait to cross. What makes Alex Senna’s characters out of the ordinary is the point of view, each of them is depicted seen from above, or slightly biased, and to complete the mural their shadow comes overwhelmingly. 

It is precisely the latter that never seems to be missing in Alex’s work and that gives the images a melancholic air: a woman walks dragging her black and dark shadow as if it were a burden to carry around, as if she were hiding all her thoughts and worries. Everyone is free to see in Alex Serra’s shadows what he wants, what makes him happy or sad, carefree or worried. 

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