The erotic softness of Marie Casaÿs’ pastels

The erotic softness of Marie Casaÿs’ pastels

Tommaso Berra · 2 months ago · Art

Nude and erotic photography succeeds most easily in conveying that tension of bodies and the warmth of skin. It is more difficult to do this with a tool that has to build up the warmth, to make people imagine it, such as a pencil or a coloured crayon.
The French artist Marie Casaÿs creates portraits with a photographic cut of scenes of intimate involvement, seen from the perspective of the person looking at the works, creating a sense of participation in the scene that is almost alienating, almost guilting the spectator.

The tips of the crayons draw traces of different intensities. Thick grooves when they trace the outline of the strings that hold the body, soft shades when they have to represent the shiver that runs over the surface of the skin when caressed by a hand.
Marie Casaÿs’ colour palette is that of a child approaching drawing for the first time: red, pink, orange, yellow, blue, all juxtaposed without any pretense of realism until they fade into each other.
The body is the starting point for the artist’s works, seen as sex from behind, caught in natural, spontaneous gestures. The decisive profiles show a physicality that is not always conventional or in line with the way the nude has been represented in classical art.

Marie Casaÿs | Collater.al
Marie Casaÿs | Collater.al
Marie Casaÿs | Collater.al
Marie Casaÿs | Collater.al
The erotic softness of Marie Casaÿs’ pastels
Art
The erotic softness of Marie Casaÿs’ pastels
The erotic softness of Marie Casaÿs’ pastels
1 · 11
2 · 11
3 · 11
4 · 11
5 · 11
6 · 11
7 · 11
8 · 11
9 · 11
10 · 11
11 · 11
Leo Caillard’s timeless classical statues

Leo Caillard’s timeless classical statues

Tommaso Berra · 2 months ago · Art

The material is white Carrara marble, the appearance is that of the statues that decorated Greek and Roman temples, but the suggestion is that of works that do not belong to an ancient era, but to a way of the future, imagined by the artist Leo Caillard.
The Wave Stone series tells of our relationship with time and the difficulty of defining its boundaries, both in everyday life and in art. The uncertainty towards the passage of time typical of our age is rendered by the Paris-based artist through the deformation of stone into waves that make the hard material fluid.

The digital age is now reflected in the restlessness and speed with which images are reproduced.
Leo Caillard’s works live in this era, creating glitches on the pillars of past eras. With messages disturbed by the lack of signal or the disconnection from the WiFi network. What remains is the certainty of the pedestal, which holds a fluid form on the point of breaking down at any moment, leaving rubble to mark the definitive abandonment of a past that is no longer relevant.

Leo Caillard | Collater.al
Leo Caillard | Collater.al
Leo Caillard | Collater.al


Leo Caillard’s timeless classical statues
Art
Leo Caillard’s timeless classical statues
Leo Caillard’s timeless classical statues
1 · 5
2 · 5
3 · 5
4 · 5
5 · 5
The gestures handed down in the works of Jessica Spence

The gestures handed down in the works of Jessica Spence

Tommaso Berra · 2 months ago · Art

The women who have been part of the life of the artist Jessica Spence are the source of inspiration for this series of portraits, images of everyday and elementary gestures, but capable of restoring the tradition of gestures repeated since childhood.
Little girls and grown-up women exchanging an affection that lies in taking care of their own beauty. Combs untangle the fine curls of shiny black hair, embellished with pearls and ribbons as if they were precious jewels. Hairstyles are undoubtedly the central subject of these works by Jessica Spence. They tell the story of a cultural landscape that is Jamaican, the country of origin of the artist, who was born and raised in New York, where she also graduated in Art Education at Lehman College.

The braids create decorative patterns, which tell the story of these scenes of life very well, as do the hands, which choreograph a choreography of holding locks of hair and then braiding them with others and then with others, in an infinite and patient repetition.
The flat colours that form the background to these portraits warm the atmosphere of the scenes, with a uniform light that illuminates the whole composition, leaving space for each colour, which contrasts with the black of the hair and the interlocking volumes.

The gestures handed down in the works of Jessica Spence
Art
The gestures handed down in the works of Jessica Spence
The gestures handed down in the works of Jessica Spence
1 · 9
2 · 9
3 · 9
4 · 9
5 · 9
6 · 9
7 · 9
8 · 9
9 · 9
Elia Sampò and the root of illustration and illumination

Elia Sampò and the root of illustration and illumination

Tommaso Berra · 2 months ago · Art

The root of the word “Illustration” is the same root of “Illumination”

Enlightenment in turn is revelation, a clarifying look at something that appears convoluted and undecipherable, like a story in which the plot does not follow a coherent flow but alternates temporal planes, creating a confused plot, in which to find disorder in order to reconstruct the pieces. Elia Sampò’s illustrations are conceptual visions, focusing on the sense of depth seen as an enigma.
The artist’s inspirations therefore come from the most recognisable reality, but also from disciplines more closely linked to abstraction, which lead him to construct his works as if they were rebuses, concepts before data verifiable through experience.

Complexity inspires Elia Sampò even before simplifications. Visual languages are mixed with philosophy and semiotics, representing reflections that appear to be paradoxes of the contemporary world.
The subjects that accompany this tale are a starry sky to be rated with appreciation, Rubik’s cubes to be stared at incredulously, oceans of likes or a delicate pen that pierces the hardest stone.

Elia Sampò and the root of illustration and illumination
Art
Elia Sampò and the root of illustration and illumination
Elia Sampò and the root of illustration and illumination
1 · 10
2 · 10
3 · 10
4 · 10
5 · 10
6 · 10
7 · 10
8 · 10
9 · 10
10 · 10
The portraits of a single line by Salventius

The portraits of a single line by Salventius

Giulia Guido · 2 months ago · Art

Niels Kiené, better known as Salventius, is a Dutch artist who specializes in minimal and bare portraits. His technique, in fact, consists in drawing faces with a single long continuous line. Once the pen, marker or brush is placed on the surface anything can happen, the important thing is to never break the line. 

This method has two immediate effects that have become two characteristic elements of Salventius’ production. First, the moment of creation must, of necessity, be quick, transforming the action into a kind of performance. Proof of this are the dozens of videos with which Niels Kiené entertains his followers on Instagram. Then, this technique foresees and contemplates error: what many artists avoid, in Salventius’ works becomes a pivotal element. A mistake can open up unexplored paths and completely change the initial idea of the drawing, surprising both the viewer and the artist himself. 

Salventius’ success also lies in the fact that he never sets limits for himself. If in the beginning he created only on paper and canvas, now the available supports are infinite.
Today, the Dutch artist’s production includes light paintings, photographs, sculptures, digital and virtual reality artworks, and even sand drawings. Any surface can be the perfect place to create and, since Salventius doesn’t need any preparatory study, any moment is the right one too. 

Discover a selection of his work below, and follow him on Instagram so you don’t miss all the others. 

The portraits of a single line by Salventius
Art
The portraits of a single line by Salventius
The portraits of a single line by Salventius
1 · 13
2 · 13
3 · 13
4 · 13
5 · 13
6 · 13
7 · 13
8 · 13
9 · 13
10 · 13
11 · 13
12 · 13
13 · 13