Marzia Gamba’s shots, an explosion of colors and flowers

Marzia Gamba’s shots, an explosion of colors and flowers

Giulia Guido · 2 years ago · Photography

A pleasure for the eyes! Marzia Gamba‘s shots are fun and colorful, disorienting and delicate and can not fail to please.

Born in 1987, Marzia Gamba is an Italian photographer who now lives and works in New York. Specialized in conceptual and still life shots, in these years her works have been presented during exhibitions in different parts of the world, from Paris to Miami, but they have also made Marzia’s work popular with different brands, leading Marzia to collaborate with Prada, Campari, Estee Lauder and many others.

Marzia’s works stand out for their bright colors, making them particularly striking, but also for a delicacy that passes through floral elements.

Some of Marzia Gamba’s shots will be exhibited in Turin starting November 27th for Ph.ocus – About Photography in the “Please, Stay Home” section and to find out more about her work we asked her some questions.

Don’t miss our interview below!

How did you approach photography and what led you to specialize in Still Life?

I approached photography when I was about 20 years old, I became passionate about it during a course at university, I started doing self portraits with an analog camera.
I was very fascinated by film and so I started working in an analog photography lab, where I spent hours in the darkroom learning how to develop film and experimenting with different printing techniques.

Then I did my first exhibitions and personal projects, which led me to be admitted to the International Center of Photography in New York. That was the real turning point. There I learned a lot, before I was mainly self-taught, I shot with a lot of heart and little technique.
Before specializing in still life I explored many types of photography, but in still life I found a way to combine my other passions like art, graphics, food and photography. For me still life is a meditative process, it fascinates me to transform everyday objects and give them a new visual and sensorial conception.

How does your creative process take place and how much time do you dedicate to the preparation of the subjects?

I would say that my creative process is a bit like me, thoughtful and impulsive at the same time. Everything starts with an idea and from there I work on the creative development where I do sketches by hand, decide the color palette and create a mood board with reference images.
After this, I start to look for objects and backgrounds, this phase amuses me a lot because it is the most manual and research part where I find myself building the set from nothing.
Finally, when everything is ready I prepare my camera, lights, tripod and start shooting and then I finish with the post-production phase.

Looking at your shots, what captures the viewer are the colors, especially the backgrounds and sets, always vivid and brilliant. How does their choice happen?

When I dedicate myself to the realization of a photo, one of the first things I think about are the colors and the emotions linked to them.
Aesthetics is very important to me. Creating harmony between objects and the colors I use is fundamental, in my creative process I always look for beauty even in common objects, making the viewer feel a new emotion looking at something familiar, playing with his perception of light and shadow, is for me an important part in the creation of a photograph.

Where do you get inspiration? Who are the photographers or artists you follow?

I take my inspiration in many different places and ways: from music, movies, museums, or everyday places. I love flower and fruit and vegetable markets, where my imagination really gets wild.

As far as artists are concerned, I am very inspired by the Surrealists: from Magritte to Salvator Dalí to Frida Kahlo, while among the contemporaries Maurizio Cattelan, Yayoy Kusama, John Baldessarri.
As for the photographers where to start, there is a line that I consider my masters, Man Ray, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Francesca Woodman, Cindy Sherman, Martin Parr, Luigi Ghirri, just to name a few. Then there is a whole line of contemporary photographers that I like a lot like Grant Cornett, Camila Falquez, Bobby Doherty, Paloma Rincon and many others.

Is there a shot that was particularly difficult to take? Tell us about it.

More than difficult I would say it was a challenge. I am reminded of one of my latest personal projects “Corona Glam” that I shot in New York in mid-March, just before the Covid-19 boom in America and the city went into complete lockdown.
I was walking around my neighborhood, in Brooklyn, looking for disinfectant gel and masks to make some shots, both impossible to find, I had been in many places and everyone told me that they were sold out for weeks, even if no one in the city was wearing masks.
So I thought of replacing the gel with a transparent soap but I had no idea how I would do for the mask. Finally, while walking around, I had an idea, I went into a nail salon and tried to convince the owner to sell me one, he gave it to me with a puzzled face. Thanks to that gesture I was able to take the picture of the melon and I reused that mask to take the plane when I had to return to Italy a few days later.

Marzia Gamba’s shots, an explosion of colors and flowers
Photography
Marzia Gamba’s shots, an explosion of colors and flowers
Marzia Gamba’s shots, an explosion of colors and flowers
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The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos

The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos

Tommaso Berra · 2 weeks ago · Photography

San Francisco is one of the most fascinating cities in the United States; over the course of two centuries it has experienced the entire evolution of American civilization firsthand, fostering the birth of artistic and cultural currents that have marked the ages.
The history of San Francisco and the Bay Area more generally is now told in a beautiful volume published by Taschen and entitled “San Francisco. Portrait of a City.” Through 500 photographs it traces the early years of industrial development and the stories of the free spirits of the 1970s through the lights and fervor of the Roaring Twenties.

The volume contains images from archives and private collections, taken by some of the most celebrated photographers, who over the course of their careers have been inspired by the California city. Inside are portraits of the many innovators who have contributed to the development of the city, a place that represents “a crystal ball in which to see a preview of what will come to us in a few years,” as Michele Masneri had described it in The Passenger magazine’s recent volume devoted to the city.
The 480-page collected shots also show a city skyline far from the one we know today, dominated by the Golden Gate Bridge of which construction work from the 1930s is visible. In addition to the Bay Area’s unique climate, “San Francisco. Portrait of a City” also shows areas the multicultural soul of the city, with images of the huge Chinatown district or Fillmore, the one historically home to Jews and Japanese.
You can purchase the book on the official Taschen website.

San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
San Francisco | Collater.al
The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos
Photography
The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos
The book that tells the story of San Francisco in 500 photos
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Japan as seen in infrared

Japan as seen in infrared

Tommaso Berra · 2 weeks ago · Photography

Hashira Yamamoto is a photographer, but he also describes himself as a traveler and researcher. Over the course of his career as an artist, he has visited 41 countries and 161 cities around the world, in which he has shot some of his photo series, to tell stories i cultures and of all the incredible people he has encountered. Over the years he has had a close look at his home nation of Japan, cultivating a passion for traditional landscapes along the Silk Road.
Yamamoto in his Asuka series has reinterpreted the tradition of historic Japanese buildings through an infrared lens, creating a dialogue between ancient and contemporary Japan to an effect that immerses traditional temples and gardens in a glitchy, vaporwave world.

The saturated colors of the photos alter the perception of a solid tradition that in some respects has remained intact over the centuries. Cultural references are not altered, architectures are not emptied of meaning, but rather taken in a new contemporary guise. Hashira Yamamoto had precisely the goal with this infrared lens to enhance even more the quiet and contemplative magic that testifies to the inherent spirituality of the places photographed. 

Japan as seen in infrared
Photography
Japan as seen in infrared
Japan as seen in infrared
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InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Giulia Guido · 2 weeks ago · Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs.
For this InstHunt collection of this week, we have selected your 10 best proposals: @polae.jpg, @laurasole_79, @claudiabellati, @carolinalecce, @eli_rmn, @_eleonoram_, @teresa_scafa, @noemily_ph, @matti_b9, @ele.naus.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on the next InstHunt.

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Photography
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
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InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Giulia Guido · 1 week ago · Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs.
For this InstHunt collection of this week we have selected your 10 best proposals: @zenzeroelimone_, @feebelli, @simeingolo, @davidecannavo, @_barbarac__, @valerycia, @sararotola, @saracamporesi.it, @il_salvo_, @_eleonoram_.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on the next InstHunt.

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Photography
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
1 · 1
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