Why do we put pennies in Penny Loafers?

Why do we put pennies in Penny Loafers?

Tommaso Berra · 2 years ago · Style

It’s been 85 years since George Henry Bass, a shoemaker from Wilton, Maine, decided to make a new model for men, with a leather band sewn onto the saddle of the shoe. The design was inspired by the leather footwear models used by Norwegian fishermen and workers, hence the name Weejuns, a nickname given by Americans to the inhabitants of the Scandinavian state.
Starting from the ’30s the moccasin becomes a shoe symbol of the American style, representing in the ’50s and ’60s the aesthetic ideal of the young people of the Ivy League and a Preppy style that well described the economic boom of those years.
Audrey Hepburn, Paul Newman, J.F. Kennedy, Steve McQueen and Michael Jackson have enriched the history of these loafers. Youth cultures (such as the Mods) defined their style and details, including the habit of embedding a coin in the cut on the shoe’s leather band, making them known as Penny Loafers. But how did the idea of this detail come about, which led the B.H.Bass brand, on the occasion of the 85th anniversary of the Penny Loafer, to mint a celebratory coin.

Penny Loafer | Collater.al

It’s hard to remember that geological era when there were no ultra-efficient phones. Around the ’50s, American college kids only had the phone lines available for emergency calls, hence the need to always have two cents on hand, the cost of a call.
With the risk of losing the coins in the pockets, the safest place was the slot of the Weejuns, which began to be called Penny Loafers. Practicality was replaced by whimsy over the years, and the shiny coin in the black leather shoe became a way to personalize one’s style. With fashion constantly looking for stories to tell, the penny in the Penny continues to be a detail with great narrative power, which has inspired brands like Berluti, Sebago and 1017 ALYX 9SM.

Why do we put pennies in Penny Loafers?
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The new Louis Vuitton City Guides and more

The new Louis Vuitton City Guides and more

Andrea Tuzio · 2 years ago · Style

It’s all about history. Mr. Louis Vuitton left his hometown of Anchay, in the department of Jura, in 1835 and walked to Paris. He wandered around for two years, supporting himself with odd jobs and sleeping wherever he could. In 1837 he finally arrived in Paris, a city profoundly transformed by the industrial revolution, and began working as an apprentice at the luggage manufacturer Monsieur Marechal. 
In 1854, after leaving Marechal’s workshop, he founded his eponymous brand of suitcases and leather goods that would become one of the most important maisons in the history of fashion.

 

The French company’s latest release goes right to underline this intrinsic link that exists between Louis Vuitton and travel: 15 revised and updated editions of the City Guides dedicated to Paris, Beijing, Berlin, Cape Town, London, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Milan, New York, Prague, Rome, Shanghai, Sydney, Taipei and Tokyo.
Each edition, available in French and English, features advice from a celebrity or local guide who offers his or her firsthand view of the city.

The news doesn’t end there though. The French fashion house is also set to release three new titles in its Fashion Eye photo series. Launched in November, the books will feature shots by three iconic photographers: American photographer Melvin Sokolsky, with his most famous fashion series shot in Paris entitled Bubble (1963) and Fly (1965); Chinese photographer Feng Li and his unconventional eye on Paris; Spanish photographer Robi Rodriguez and his personal vision of London.

The new City Guides and Fashion Eye Books are available in Vuitton boutiques, on the French maison’s website and in selected bookstores and concept stores.

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Barbour jackets reinterpreted by NOAH

Barbour jackets reinterpreted by NOAH

Tommaso Berra · 2 years ago · Style

Impossible not to recognize, among a thousand winter jackets, the corduroy collar of the Bedale and Beaufort jackets by Barbour. A classic of English style and not only, reinterpreted this season in a new collaboration between Barbour and NOAH. This is the third collaboration between the two brands, in as many seasons, after the one presented for FW20 and SS21. The capsule consists of six garments, three waxed Bedale jackets, in the colorways “Wine”, “Nicotine” and “Dark Navy” and with tartan lining and the Beaufort model, in heavy wool and in the tones “Tan”, “Brown Plaid”, “Pink Tone”. The pink color of the latter is the real highlight of the collection, along with the burgundy color of the Bedale. The gusseted pockets, the contrasting colors and textures with the collar, the embroidered NOAH logo and the double zipper are some of the details that make the NOAH x Barbour collection one of the most interesting of the winter.

The capsule will be released on October 28 and will be available in the two brands‘ stores and at Dover Street Market in London.

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LOEWE will support the activities of the Studio Ghibli museum

LOEWE will support the activities of the Studio Ghibli museum

Andrea Tuzio · 2 years ago · Style

The stories we learn about as children will accompany us for the rest of our lives.
Precisely for this reason we should all be grateful to the Spanish fashion house LOEWE that, through the LOEWE FOUNDATION, has decided to collaborate with the Tokuma Memorial Cultural Foundation for Animation to support the activities of the Ghibli Museum in Mitaka, urban area of Tokyo, for the next 3 years. 

Opened in 2001, the Ghibli Museum is a place where all Studio Ghibli fans can get an up-close look at the animation processes of the studio’s most famous films founded in 1985 by Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata, such as Spirited Away and My Neighbor Totoro.

“Miyazaki wanted to build a museum that embraced people’s ability to ‘feel’ a truly human warmth to the core.” On permanent display are representations of how the studio’s animated films are made, as well as what the creators see and feel when creating a film”, this is LOEWE’s note on the sidelines of the project.

Sheila Loewe, president of the LOEWE FOUNDATION, said: “Studio Ghibli and LOEWE share many values, from a long-standing commitment to craftsmanship to an enduring love of nature. We look forward to becoming part of their story, helping to spread the unique appeal of the Ghibli Museum around the world”.

The LOEWE FOUNDATION – created by Enrique Loewe in 1988 to promote creativity, organize educational programs and protect cultural heritage in the fields of poetry, dance, photography, design and craftsmanship – aims to support the museum to enable it to carry out its exhibitions and activities.

 
 
 
 
 
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Un post condiviso da LOEWE Foundation (@loewefoundation)

During the pandemic, the Ghibli Museum was forced to close its doors twice.
In order to avoid its permanent closure, the city of Mitaka launched a crowdfunding campaign through which over $275,000 was raised. It will be possible to contribute to the fundraiser until January 1, 2022. LOEWE’s initiative therefore comes just in time to try and save a magical place dedicated to art and creativity.

The CEO of the Ghibli Museum, Kazuki Anzai, said: “We are delighted that LOEWE, a maison with craftsmanship at the core of its identity, and the Ghibli Museum, which communicates the energy of craftsmanship through animation, are joining together”.

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Dior makeover your table for Halloween

Dior makeover your table for Halloween

Andrea Tuzio · 2 years ago · Style

We are just a few days away from the most spooky and terrifying time of the year, when every aspect of our daily lives takes on macabre contours.
Halloween remains one of those commercially successful holidays.

On the occasion of the scariest night of the year, Maison Dior gives you the opportunity to decorate your table in full Halloween style. In collaboration with the Italian illustrative artist Pietro Ruffo and the ceramist Jean Roger, Dior has created a series of items for the home that recall the gothic world and the classic iconography of this holiday. 

Roger’s ceramic pumpkins are distinguished by strong realism and an extremely distinctive shade of bright orange. To decorate your table, in addition to the ever-present pumpkins, the French maison offers plates illustrated by Pietro Ruffo.
Inspired by vintage tarot cards and their reading – a recurring theme under the direction of Maria Grazia Chiuri and a passion of Christian Dior – the black and white plates illustrated by the Italian artist convey at the same time charm, seduction and restlessness. 

Made of fine Limoges porcelain, they are accompanied by an equally eerie set of glasses and cutlery. There is no shortage of candles, always signed by Maison Dior, to create the right and spooky atmosphere during the most lugubrious dinner of the year.

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