Architectural photomontages by Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar

Architectural photomontages by Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar

Collater.al Contributors · 6 months ago · Design

Architect Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar has put together spectacular photomontages that combine archaeological sites in Iran with contemporary buildings by masters of architecture such as Zaha Hadid, Daniel Libeskind and Norman Foster.

His conceptual project, entitled Expanding Iranian Ancient Architecture, imagines modern buildings that intersect with ancient oriental architecture.

Famous existing buildings, such as the Libeskind Studio at the Royal Ontario Museum in Canada and the Louvre glass pyramid by Ieoh Ming Pei, overlap with pre-Islamic castles and royal palaces at UNESCO World Heritage sites in Iran. Another image, Zaha Hadid Architects’ Port House, is an extension of the cantilevered fire station on Tepe Sialk, an ancient archaeological site in Kashan. In another, the glass superstructure of Foster + Partners at the Apple Store in Hangzhou protects the remains of Takht-e-Jamshid in Fars.

Forouzanfar has combined these images to examine the tension between the visions of the past and the future and initiate a conversation on the conservation of the sites themselves. Linking architecture from the Western canon to pre-Islamic architecture was a deliberately stimulating choice for the viewer and for himself.

There is a precious legacy of the Iranian past that has become a global record. But due to neglect and lack of protection, many of these buildings have been destroyed or are in danger of being destroyed.

By creating photomontages of UNESCO-listed sites superimposed on modern reference buildings, the architect wants to highlight how Iran’s architectural heritage is neglected and wonders how it could be restored.

“The preservation and restoration of monuments are important in a country with a lot of historical heritage, and its strategies need to be constantly reviewed to find the best practices and the most up-to-date principles.
Historical monuments in Iran are eroding and decaying, and are less likely to be restored with modern methods that can derive from contemporary critical thinking.”

The use of contemporary architecture to help preserve UNESCO World Heritage sites is a delicate balance for architects. In Bahrain, Swiss architect Valerio Olgiati has built a large red concrete canopy to protect the ruins of an ancient market and provide a unique visiting experience. Why not take it as an example?

Text by Elisa Scotti

Architectural photomontages by Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar
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Architectural photomontages by Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar
Architectural photomontages by Mohammad Hassan Forouzanfar
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New Wave, recycle plastic to build a school in Mexico

New Wave, recycle plastic to build a school in Mexico

Collater.al Contributors · 6 months ago · Design

Ulf Majergren Architects (UMA) has developed a conceptual project, “New Wave”, reusing plastic bottles from the ocean to build an art school in Mexico. Recycled objects were used for the facade of the building so that a positive message could be conveyed and the local community sensitized. All this in addition to the fact that the country generates about half a million tons of plastic waste per year.

The construction simulates real plastic waves that aim to amaze passers-by and at the same time offer a stimulating environment for children, but also to remember that the bottles come from there, from the sea.

The bottles are first pierced, inserted into a folding bar, then stacked on top of each other and finally given the desired shape, in this case, of large waves. To be clearer, they are joined together as if it were a fence. The bottles near the ground are filled with cement or sand to ensure stability and each element is also attached to a wall or a sheet in mid-air.

The colors are those typical of the sea, or better, of a wave, blue-cyan-white. The structure also offers shelter from the rain and the sun and in some parts also create seats and tables. The choice to give life to such a faithful form is to raise awareness and make people reflect on how plastic is damaging our planet and how it can be reused and used in architecture.

Text by Elisa Scotti

New Wave, recycle plastic to build a school in Mexico
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New Wave, recycle plastic to build a school in Mexico
New Wave, recycle plastic to build a school in Mexico
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Christophe Benichou and the play of lights and shadows in the desert

Christophe Benichou and the play of lights and shadows in the desert

Collater.al Contributors · 6 months ago · Design

Christophe Benichou is a French architect who collaborates with various studios from all over the world. His projects are focused on the use of all the senses, some of which are truly amazing and with particular forms while remaining simple and minimal.

Built-in the middle of the desert, solitary and colored with sand, his latest work is called “Sesame” and evokes the ambiguity of a fixed or immediate movement, but also of an uncertain time, between ruin and contemporaneity. It has the appearance of a cube that breaks up on each side, detaching itself from the origin, just the space to let the user in. Inside, there is a warm and welcoming domestic environment, and every time there is an open space, there is a part of the house. The bed, the bathroom, the dining room, and the kitchen.

Christophe Benichou’s projects is a play of lights and shadows, open and ajar, that does not give any direct vision on the external space, a place of introspection, calm and ambiguity.

Christophe Benochou e il gioco di luci ed ombre nel deserto Collateral 2
Christophe Benochou e il gioco di luci ed ombre nel deserto Collateral 2
Christophe Benochou e il gioco di luci ed ombre nel deserto Collateral 2
Christophe Benochou e il gioco di luci ed ombre nel deserto Collateral 2

Text by Elisa Scotti

Christophe Benichou and the play of lights and shadows in the desert
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Christophe Benichou and the play of lights and shadows in the desert
Christophe Benichou and the play of lights and shadows in the desert
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Trunk House, the boutique hotel in the streets of Tokyo

Trunk House, the boutique hotel in the streets of Tokyo

Collater.al Contributors · 6 months ago · Design

The Trunk hotel’s brand has worked with the Tripster design studio to create the Trunk House, a boutique hotel in Tokyo, inspired by traditional Japanese aesthetics, located in Kagurazaka, a district of Tokyo.

The idea for this type of hotel came from the lounges that were in Tokyo years ago, where artists and creatives gathered – spaces where people shared ideas and exchanged thoughts and culture, similar to the French Salòn. From here, create a contemporary environment that had the same function.

But the strong point is an unusual and small disco of a bright red that is considered the smallest disco in Japan. Characterized by a curved minibar, a glittering disco ball, a dance floor full of lights and, if necessary, a karaoke.

In the tiled bathroom, there is a huge square and giant bathtub in cypress. In the tea room, the highlight is the built-in fireplace in front of which are arranged mats and tatami. The living room is also very cozy, with a large brown leather sofa, a glass coffee table, and large windows and wall. The whole thing is designed to look like a genkan.

The master bedroom consists of a classic Japanese style bed, a mattress resting on a raised wooden platform. The dining room is characterized by almost black walls, like shutters, a long oak table, soft lights and a large square French window, which overlooks a small courtyard.

The hotel can accommodate up to 6 people.

Trunk House, il mini hotel nelle strade di Tokyo | Collater.al

Text by Elisa Scotti

Trunk House, the boutique hotel in the streets of Tokyo
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Trunk House, the boutique hotel in the streets of Tokyo
Trunk House, the boutique hotel in the streets of Tokyo
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Paranoia, dreams and thoughts by the creative mind of Tyler Spangler

Paranoia, dreams and thoughts by the creative mind of Tyler Spangler

Collater.al Contributors · 6 months ago · Design

We have already talked about Tyler Spangler, American artist and designer known for the psychedelic and surrealist style. He studies psychology in College for working in some psychiatric hospital or becoming a psychologist, but in the meantime, he realizes a stronger need: create art and explore the styles that attract him the most. Since that year he begins to collect more than 2,000 pieces, including personal creations and projects developed at the Art Center College of Design for graphic design.

Since that Tyler decides to start his own business and work freelance, defining what his style is now.

He’s back to surprise us with even more pop and colorful images on which messages and effect sentences by his creative mind. In addition to being inspired by vintage images and photographs, he takes as a reference to the artistic currents of the past such as Dadaism, Constructivism, and Surrealism to give life to his creative world.

Each creation is totally different from the previous one, which is why Tyler gets old.

Take a look at the gallery below and follow him on its website.

Text by Giordana Bonanno.

Paranoia, dreams and thoughts by the creative mind of Tyler Spangler
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Paranoia, dreams and thoughts by the creative mind of Tyler Spangler
Paranoia, dreams and thoughts by the creative mind of Tyler Spangler
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