What has changed in the last 10 years according to Prada

What has changed in the last 10 years according to Prada

Andrea Tuzio · 4 months ago · Style

All the world’s a stage and all the men and women merely players.
William Shakespeare managed to encapsulate a part of the human experience in this metaphor that has become so famous. 

With the FW22 Menswear by Prada presented yesterday afternoon at the Prada Foundation Depot in Milan, the Italian fashion house has staged, exactly ten years later, a new fashion show that has seen among the models who have brought on the catwalk this new collection designed by Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons, 10 Hollywood actors as it happened for the FW12. 

To fully understand the similarities but above all the differences and try to connect the dots that unite the Prada FW12 and FW22 shows, we need to take a leap back in time and go back to that very January of 2012 when some of the actors who over time have become iconic faces of the brand walked the runway among the models.
It is clear that Miuccia and Raf Simons have taken their cue from the show of 10 years ago but have overturned the concepts, as in a sort of historical realignment based on the circumstantial elements that are determining our society and our everyday life. 

If with the fashion show of January 2012 Prada wanted to represent the power (and the man of power) played by actors of the caliber of Willem Dafoe, Adrien Brody, Tim Roth and Gary Oldman – which marked a historic moment for contemporary fashion – this time the 10 actors chosen to play on the catwalk the normal man in his daily life with his work “uniforms”. 

“Body of Work”, this is the title of the collection, puts at the center of the narrative just the work and its uniforms to which Miuccia and Raf have given pride and pride through tailoring, and emphasizing the dignity of the daily commitment of each of us.

“The approach is to make all garments equally important. Underneath the coats and suits are suits made of lightweight material, deux-pièces, that evoke the idea of work, movement, activity and leisure. They are rematerialized, to give them a different importance. In tech silk, leather, luxury cotton, they replace the traditional historical shirt/belt/tie, giving a new energy and reality, even a younger attitude. Always respecting the importance of sartorial classicism, while moving into the futur”, said Raf Simons.

Kyle MacLachlan (who opened the show), Asa Butterfield, Damson Idris, Filippo Scotti, Thomas Brodie-Sangster, Tom Mercier, Jaden Michael, Louis Partridge, Ashton Sanders and Jeff Goldblum (who closed it), this is the cast that makes up the group of actors who paraded yesterday in the middle of a movie theater thanks to the staging of the AMO studio – by now a constant collaboration between the division that deals with research and design of Rem Koolhaas’ OMA studio and Prada. 

A stage on which a representation took place in which all human beings deserve the same equal dignity and in which there is no longer a hierarchy, not even clothes have it. Clothes are no longer a glorification of the role one plays within society but are instead a powerful praise of the person wearing it, their humanity and their daily commitment. 
“This interaction allows merit and value to be placed on human endeavor at all levels: work uniforms, thus perceived, take on a new importance. Daily activity becomes a moment of occasion and acquires relevance and value, emphasizing the importance of work within society”, the note accompanying the collection reveals.

A radical change of course, a very precise and deliberate contrast developed by Prada in this FW22. The celebration of power and the man of power leaves room for the exaltation of work, whatever it is, as a daily commitment of man that gives dignity and pride regardless of hierarchies and roles.
I close this reflection on power, the dignity of work and its uniforms that yesterday’s Prada fashion show made us do with a quote taken from a TV series, The Iron Throne, uttered by the master of whispers Varys, who understood power and its facets like few other: “Power resides where men believe that power resides. It is a trick, a shadow on the wall. And a very small man is able to cast a very large shadow.”.

Below you can see the entire Prada FW22 show.

What has changed in the last 10 years according to Prada
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What has changed in the last 10 years according to Prada
What has changed in the last 10 years according to Prada
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Dior and ancient Greece in a new documentary

Dior and ancient Greece in a new documentary

Andrea Tuzio · 4 months ago · Style

There are connections, unions, and conjunctions that without proper exploration and intimate, personal storytelling, would remain hidden in the folds of history.
Luckily for us, director Marianna Economou had the opportunity to follow the conceptualization and creation of Maria Grazia Chiuri‘s Dior Cruise 2022 collection.

 

 
 
 
 
 
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Un post condiviso da Dior Official (@dior)

What came out is the stunning documentary “The Greek Bar Jacket“, an all-encompassing, personal and intimate exploration of the references, influences, collaborations, moments and emotions that made the Dior Cruise 2022 collection inspired by ancient Greece unique and distinctive. 
The film reveals the incredible skills of a number of Greek artisans put together with those working within the atelier of the maison Dior, as well as showing us the role played by the art and architecture of classical Greece in a sort of intercultural and temporal exchange. 

This union between Dior and ancient Greece turns out to be a simple and intuitive syntony that sees its perfect exemplification in the Cruise 2022 collection. A story, that of “The Greek Bar Jacket”, which travels throughout the Peloponnese showing us the encounters, comparisons and work that are the basis for the construction of the collection.

The tailor Aristeidis Tzonevrakis, the textile company of Kostas Mouhtaridis and Dimitra Kolotoura up to the jacquard illustrations of Christiana Soulou and many other local artisans who show us how the classicism of ancient Greece has been married to perfection with the elegance and refinement typical of the French maison. 
The past and the present are aligned marking the immortal power of beauty that can never be scratched by the passage of time.

Below you can watch Marianna Economou’s documentary, “The Greek Bar Jacket”.

Dior and ancient Greece in a new documentary
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Dior and ancient Greece in a new documentary
Dior and ancient Greece in a new documentary
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Junya Watanabe’s collection with Jay Kay of Jamiroquai

Junya Watanabe’s collection with Jay Kay of Jamiroquai

Andrea Tuzio · 4 months ago · Style

After a few seconds from the beginning of the video of Junya Watanabe MAN’s Fall/Winter 22 mini show, I was catapulted directly into 1996 and I couldn’t stay still in my chair and I completely abandoned all modesty dancing like a madman. 
Yes, because for this collection the Japanese designer collaborated with a piece of music history and, more generally, of the 90s and 2000s, Jay Kay, front-man and leader of Jamiroquai.

 
 
 
 
 
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Un post condiviso da Junya Watanabe (@junyawatanabe)

Raise your hand if you don’t remember Virtual Insanity, single extracted from Travelling Without Moving, Jamiroquai’s third studio album, well, the digital presentation of the collection is a sort of remake of the very famous video of the Jamiroquai song, in which Jay Kay dances in an absolutely iconic way inside a semi-empty room, with a gray ceiling and an aseptic atmosphere.

Jay Kay founded Jamiroquai in 1992 and has enjoyed enormous success globally, not only for his distinctive voice but also for his unique style that takes inspiration from the Iroquois or Haudenosaunee, a Native American population originally settled between the present United States of America and Canada from which the band takes its name, and other indigenous cultures of the world. There is no shortage of collaborations, among the most important are those with Carhartt, Levi’s and New Balance.

Also read: Junya Watanabe, the ordinary that becomes extraordinary

Junya Watanabe, Jay Kay and the Secretariat of Mexican Culture have joined forces for this FW22 that brings together the aesthetic of the Japanese designer with the typical colors and patterns of the Iroquois and the originality of Jay Kay. 

In addition to draped outerwear with vibrant patterns reminiscent of those of Native American indigenous peoples, also in collaboration with Pendleton Woolen Mills, and jackets and sweaters with patchwork designs, hats (a fundamental and super-characteristic part of Jay Kay) come directly from London-based designer Benny Andallo.

Below you can take a look at Junya Watanabe MAN’s FW22 mini show.

Junya Watanabe’s collection with Jay Kay of Jamiroquai
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Junya Watanabe’s collection with Jay Kay of Jamiroquai
Junya Watanabe’s collection with Jay Kay of Jamiroquai
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Yu Nagaba’s illustrations for UNIQLO and the Louvre

Yu Nagaba’s illustrations for UNIQLO and the Louvre

Andrea Tuzio · 4 months ago · Style

Over the years, Japanese fast fashion giant UNIQLO has consolidated its close relationship with the art world. The announcement of the four-year partnership with the Louvre Museum last year is just the confirmation of a trend that has involved the entire fashion world in a transversal way. From the big fashion houses, to streetwear brands, up to the big chains, art is assuming an increasingly incisive value in the strategies of the brands. 

It was news last night that UNIQLO and the Louvre Museum announced a new partnership with a three-way collaboration with Japanese contemporary illustrator and artist Yu Nagaba

 

 
 
 
 
 
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Un post condiviso da UNIQLO UT (@uniqlo.ut)

Nagaba, in addition to having created a hand-drawn logo for the Louvre x UNIQLO collabo, has re-imagined according to his style made of simple lines, cartoony authenticity and minimalism, the most important and famous works kept and exhibited in the Parisian museum – there are over 35,000 – including the “Mona Lisa” by Leonardo Da Vinci and the “Astronomer” by Dutch artist Johannes Vermeer. 
These reinterpretations also playful in their simplicity, go to decorate and embellish the classic UNIQLO tees and a set of dishes, at least this is what we have been shown so far.

But who is Yu Nagaba, the Japanese artist involved in this collabo?

Nagaba was born in Tokyo in 1976 where he grew up and studied. He enrolled at Tokyo Zokei University, a private university based in Hachiōji founded in 1966 by Yoko Kuwasawa (1910-1977) , artist, stylist and design journalist. Nestled in a forest just a short walk from Aihara Station, this college offers its students a 4-year course of study dedicated to art. Yu graduated with a degree in Design and his work ranged from magazine collaborations, book cover designs, advertising and of course partnerships with fashion brands.

In his career he has already worked with brands such as ASICS, G-SHOCK and BEAMS and has created illustrations for RIMOWA, Technics, Spotify, Universal Music and Monocle, gaining appreciation both at home and internationally. The ability of Yu Nagaba is to tell beautiful stories through his immediate style making us rediscover the beauty of simple things, a gift that especially in a historical moment like the one we are living, represents an enormous wealth.

The Louvre x UNIQLO x Yu Nagaba collaboration is expected to be released on January 31 but we will keep you updated. 

Yu Nagaba’s illustrations for UNIQLO and the Louvre
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Yu Nagaba’s illustrations for UNIQLO and the Louvre
Yu Nagaba’s illustrations for UNIQLO and the Louvre
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Thierry Mugler, “in a stubborn and contrary direction”

Thierry Mugler, “in a stubborn and contrary direction”

Andrea Tuzio · 4 months ago · Style

“You have to have guts to be happy; you have to be brave”.
Thierry Mugler was courageous, most of all. At 73, one of the most brazenly surprising, provocative, talented and extreme couturiers of the last 40 years, French designer Thierry Mugler, passed away yesterday. 

 
 
 
 
 
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Un post condiviso da MUGLER (@muglerofficial)

“It is with deep sadness that Maison Mugler announces the passing of Manfred Thierry Mugler. A visionary whose imagination as a couturier, perfumer and creator of images allowed people around the world to be bolder and dream bigger every day”, with these words the maison he founded announced the designer’s passing through a post on Instagram.

A man who never gave up, who fought against judgments that were too hasty, who got up after falling and who reacted to life’s slaps by becoming a point of reference for women’s power dressing and not only. His models dressed as robots, his clothes inspired by mermaids, insects, film noir or covered with hooks, fully represent the irreplaceable imprint that will never be erased of his unmatched creativity.
Between an enormous wealth of knowledge, boundless creativity and a unique vision has marked the high fashion of the 90s like very few.

Thierry Mugler was born in Strasbourg in 1948 and since he was a child his attentions were focused more on drawing than on school. At the age of 9 he began to study ballet and at 14 he joined the corps de ballet of the Opéra national du Rhi. Dance, however, did not distract him from his passion for drawing, in fact, at the same time he began studying interior design at the School of Decorative Arts in Strasbourg.
At the age of 22 he moved to Paris and began working as a window dresser and in his spare time he designed clothes. In 1973 he presented his first collection Café de Paris, but it did not impress and went almost completely unnoticed. And it is from this failure that Mugler builds his success. 
In 1975 he founded the fashion house that bears his name and he completely detaches himself from the stereotypes of the time and begins to imagine a new world, without rules or limits, finding his inspirations far from the world strictly related to couture. 
His women are strong, gritty and sexually brazen, characterized by an imagery that winks at a dystopian world: robotic women, automatons, butterflies, elegant soldiers who totally distort the ideal of ethereal, almost princely woman that the high fashion of the time had imposed.  
“My work pays homage to the woman and her personality – I give them an armor”.
In 1991, he made a singer-actress, Diana Ross, walk the runway for the first time; in 1992, he directed the video for George Michael’s Too Funky – during which his own show is seen – and created Angel, his first perfume that would become one of the best-selling fragrances of all time.
He retired from the fashion world in 2002 to concentrate on himself and his body, which he transformed by dedicating himself to bodybuilding.

In the last 2/3 years, his work and his creations have returned powerfully to the center of the fashion-related narrative thanks to the likes of Cardi B who wore several of his vintage looks during the Grammy awards, and Kim Kardashian who for the 2019 Met Gala wore a dress made especially for the occasion by Mugler, to arrive at the “Thierry Mugler, Couturissime” exhibition at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris and opened on September 30, 2021. 

“I made clothes because I was looking for something that didn’t exist. I had to try to create my own world”.

Yesterday he left us an atypical utopian, an idealist, one who was never afraid of anything and who always went “in a stubborn and contrary direction”

Thierry Mugler, “in a stubborn and contrary direction”
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Thierry Mugler, “in a stubborn and contrary direction”
Thierry Mugler, “in a stubborn and contrary direction”
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