Re:Humanism, the exhibition about connection between contemporary art and Artificial Intelligence

Re:Humanism, the exhibition about connection between contemporary art and Artificial Intelligence

Giulia Guido · 9 months ago · Art

From Wednesday 5 to Sunday 30 May, the Spazio CORNER MAXXI of the Museo nazionale delle Arti del XXI secolo, in Rome, will open its doors to host the second edition of the exhibition Re:Humanism – Re:define the Boundaries.

Ten artists will investigate the relationship between Artificial Intelligence and contemporary art, inviting to reflect on a future increasingly linked to technology in all its aspects. For this reason, the works will touch on themes related to society, but also to biodiversity, ecological awareness, gender identity. 

WHAT:
Re:Humanism – Re:define the Boundaries
WHEN:
5 – 30 MAY
WHERE:
Spazio CORNER MAXXI, Museo nazionale delle Arti del XXI secolo (RomE)

The artists in the exhibition will be the Entangled Others, Yuguang Zhang, Johanna Bruckner, Irene Fenara, the collective Umanesimo Artificiale, the duo composed by Elizabeth Christoforetti & Romy El Sayah, Mariagrazia Pontorno, Egor Kraft, Numero Cromatico and Carola Bonfili, and their projects in the exhibition are the winners of Re:Humanism Art Prize

The relationship between contemporary art and Artificial Intelligence is a theme that can not be ignored and, in addition to making us discover worlds and technologies far from our daily lives, can give rise to a healthy debate on the future of art and beyond.
We at Collater.al were lucky enough to ask a few questions to Daniela Cotimbo, curator and President of the association Re:Humanism, who told us what we will find in the exhibition and her point of view on the subject. Don’t miss the interview below and some images of the works and visit the official website to find out all the Infos!

Before talking about the exhibition, let’s talk a bit about you. Your research has always focused on the analysis and investigation of issues related to the present through different and new means of expression and through new technologies. Where do your interest in this subject and these themes come from?

The fascination for the world of technology has always been part of me, I think. I belong to that generation of people who have seen the spread of the Internet and subsequent technologies connected through devices such as smartphones, PCs and more. Behind what seem to be simple tools I read all the complexity of human progress and its social implications. If art has accompanied me throughout my school career, technology has entered in an important way in my research, starting from my three-year thesis, where I explored the worlds of art within Second Life. The approach to artificial intelligence, on the other hand, was born from my meeting with Alan Advantage, the company that promoted the prize, which from the beginning stimulated me with transversal themes and deeper technical knowledge. Today I believe it is really difficult to keep technology out of humanistic discourse.

From May 5 to 30 “Re:Humanism – Re:define the boundaries” will open its doors, what will a person who decides to visit the exhibition find in front of him?

Good question, certainly not a canonical exhibition, in the sense that if you expect to be surrounded by robots, cables and computers (although I love the aesthetics of technology) you might be disappointed. In fact, this award is a testament to how technological languages such as AI are slowly penetrating more and more into the fabric of contemporary art. Artists are using them both as an end in themselves, to better understand their nature and implications, and as a tool to support their ideas or imagine new types of interfaces. Thus, it may happen to see in the exhibition a tapestry that makes us reflect on the concept of extinction of tigers (Irene Fenara), an aquarium populated by a coral reef generated by algorithms (Entangled Others), a bed animated by a non-human gesture (Yuguang Zhang) or the sound recall of a modified DNA (Artificial Humanism). On the contrary, there are other works that tell how artificial intelligence helps us to revisit ancient languages such as Chinese painting (Egor Kraft), the untranslatable Voynich manuscript (Mariagrazia Pontorno) or the poetic verses contained in epitaphs (Numero Cromatico). Finally, there are works that exploit the language and culture that revolve around AI to imagine new forms of relationship between species (Johanna Bruckner), between body and space (Elizabeth Christoforetti & Romy El Sayah) and existence within the digital (Carola Bonfili).

re:humanism
Molecular Sex, Johanna Bruckner

When you try to relate distant and separate disciplines, such as art and new technologies, something extraordinary is often born, but not everyone can understand it right away. How would you explain to these people the need to create new ways of artistic production?

On this we must make a premise, art has always gone hand in hand with what we used to call technique and that today through technological advancement has become a real language. When, for example, cave painting was born, someone understood that he could use tools or his own body to communicate with others in a symbolic language. If we think about this in relation to technology, we realize that what we are witnessing is nothing more than a natural process of evolution of art as an expression of the reality that surrounds us. Certainly technology today runs faster than ever and it is not always easy to keep up with new discoveries and the latest developments. However, it is an effort that needs to be made because the implications, and here I am referring especially to AI, are so many and now concern us very closely. Perhaps the opposite is true, namely that it is the art that, by subverting the rules of the game, helps us to better understand technology.

Among the works that will be on display, the one that attracted my attention the most is “Epitaphs for the human artist” by Numero Cromatico. It is a sort of epitaph that definitively decrees the death of the human artist. Do you think that this figure will disappear completely in the future or do you think that the human artist will resist in time but will have to share the role of the creator with technological devices, artificial intelligence and algorithms?

Numero Cromatico’s work acts on several semantic levels. It certainly helps us reflect on how poetic forms that have been handed down spontaneously, such as the verses normally contained in epitaphs, in the very near future will be totally the prerogative of algorithms. The point, again, is not whether it will be the human artist who will disappear but how these forms of expression will be passed on to us. Are we willing to entrust an intimate memory such as the one that accompanies our lives to an AI? And if so, how will we experience it? To answer your question even better, AI algorithms already have a very developed “creative” potential, the so called “Black Box”, a latent semantic space that is not yet clear to us how it is able to process the data we give it. All this is very fascinating but the real question we should ask ourselves is: what is art “for” and why should an AI replace an artist in this sense? The answer I can give myself today is that AI enhances the creative possibilities of an artist in so many ways that I am very curious to explore.

Re:Humanism
Epitaphs For The Human Artist, Numero Cromatico

In the last few years, and especially in the last few months, we are noticing how not only artistic production is becoming more and more linked to the technological world, but also the sale and fruition of art are becoming more digital. Do you think that in this way, in the long run, art will be more accessible to everyone or, on the contrary, will it become more exclusive?

I guess you are referring in particular to the rise of NFTs (Non-fungible tokens) which at this moment represent a very interesting phenomenon within the art world and beyond. Personally, I don’t like sectorizations, I think that technology is now part of the tools available to artists but certainly, not being neutral tools, every time we introduce one we have to expand our gaze to the context of production. I mention NFTs because they actually represent a nice paradigm shift, they push us to conceive art no longer as an object, something to be owned necessarily in a physical way, in most cases we are talking about digital formats that can be presented on screens but also simply be stored in a folder on our PC. Certainly a technology of this kind is revolutionizing the way we approach art, favoring the rise of new types of collectors and enthusiasts. However, we must specify that these collective phenomena could be temporary and due to the initial enthusiasm, what could easily happen is that everything returns to the canons of the traditional art market. So, to answer you, I have to say that the complexity of contemporary art is not something we can renounce to and it is not said that technologies facilitate the access to complex contents, however I believe in a greater need by artists to measure themselves with the themes of our time and this, probably can really facilitate this encounter with the public.

Re:Humanism
(Non-)Human: The Moving Bedsheet, Yuguang Zhang
re:humanism
Body As Building, Elizabeth Bowie Christoforetti & Romy El Sayah
Re:Humanism, the exhibition about connection between contemporary art and Artificial Intelligence
Art
Re:Humanism, the exhibition about connection between contemporary art and Artificial Intelligence
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Cinematography – Normal People

Cinematography – Normal People

Giordana Bonanno · 5 days ago · Photography

If we think about our past, are we able to scan our lives through a plot? I personally find it a bit difficult, what I remember vividly is always accompanied by a feeling, by an emotional state that, beautiful or bad, has enclosed a set of days or moments. Yet we idealize the design of a life in time bands with childhood, adolescence, “middle” adulthood, “advanced” adulthood, etc.. But do we really need to divide the years in this way or are we just trying to justify the ages through this idea? Normal People, the TV series directed by Lenny Abrahamson, made me think about a few things and realize that maybe there’s nothing normal about people, or maybe it’s all too normal.

Released during the summer of 2020, the series is based on the second novel by Irish author Sally Rooney and tells the story of Marianne and Connell, two young people who attend the same high school. His mother works as a housekeeper in the Sheridan’s big house. Connell is a popular athlete and the bright student everyone looks up to. Marianne is “uncool,” grumpy and rebellious despite an impeccable high school career. From this premise, it’s as if we can already have a clear picture of the two guys’ plans, know their lives and even imagine the end. But while all this might be true, the only thing we’ll need to know is that the plot is a secondary source. The story, theirs, is not driven by the events that sanction the beginning and happy ending of something, but by the emotional peaks of the two characters who learn about themselves in the difficulties and moments of discouragement. 

And if the dialogues help us to understand them better, their gestures will be the culmination in which all thoughts will converge; it will seem to us to have lived those sensations and we will almost want to try them again. 

The physical touch allows Marianne and Connell to show emotional vulnerability that is otherwise given to them with incredible difficulty. Ita O’Brien, who helped coordinate these scenes, is the author of a set of guidelines on how to ethically stage erotic scenes; she was the one who helped film another sex-positive modern series, “Sex Education.” Director Abrahamson and coordinator O’Brian wanted the sex in the show to feel open, normal and natural, and somewhat equal to any dialogue-this approach almost literally quotes the way Rooney herself handles the subject matter in the book. And director of photography Susie Lovell says that the main reference on set in terms of nudity and color solutions was a candid series of photographs by Nan Goldin

Speaking of which, it’s worth noting how the visual solutions rhyme with a detached style of storytelling: blue tones even on hot summer days, delicate macro photography and a tactile approach to the set design, heavy curtains, velvet or velvet pleasant to the touch, woolen sweaters, textured bedding, peeling on the ceiling wet locks adhered to the forehead. Where the show lacks depth, it makes up for it with an enveloping atmosphere. Sometimes it’s hard to believe that the episodes last only half an hour – for a story where formally little happens, the experience is very intense. 

Simple but visually striking scenes reminiscent of the work of photographer Julien Lallouette. Born in 1991, Julien is a French art director and photographer, born in Le Havre, and based in London. In addition to commercial work, Julien does personal projects where she focuses on one person at a time. His delicacy lies in leaving space for the subject, to tell someone’s story through the habits and gestures trapped in the photos. Visiting her site you can find different series of shots, each dedicated to a different person and titled with the name of the protagonist. Friends, acquaintances, but also models are portrayed in domestic and intimate environments where they have the freedom to show themselves as they really are.

The question most remains this: are we all perfect or are we just imperfectly normal people? Sally Rooney says “what if we admit extreme individualism is unsustainable and try to find the meaning of life in a variety of contacts with others?” What we seek is the possibility of being ourselves while remaining close to others.

Did you know: After filming wrapped, Paul Mescal gave his character’s signature chain necklace as a gift to Daisy Edgar-Jones.

Genre: Romance

Director: Lenny Abrahamson

Director of photography: Suzie Lavelle

WritersSally Rooney, Alice Birch, Mark O’Rowe

Stars: Paul Mascal, Daisy Edgar-Jones

Cinematography – Normal People
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JF Julian photos are a passe partout

JF Julian photos are a passe partout

Tommaso Berra · 6 days ago · Photography

JF Julian is the passe partout of a grand hotel, giving access to rooms where lonely, melancholic and beautiful women stay, undressed and lying on beds. With their gaze pointing towards nowhere, the four women portrayed by the Paris-born photographer seem to live inside a film noir, in which an unexplored psychological abyss emerges.
The magical realism of these photographs creates almost surreal settings, where you can’t tell where the light is coming from and where the objects that furnish the room are never where you would expect to find them. The loneliness shrouded in darkness is disturbing, from the aridity only the natural eroticism of the bodies is saved, rendered through poses that enhance anatomical angles and body tensions.

After entering the rooms of this hotel, you can check out all of JF Julian’s projects on Instagram or on the artist’s website.

Models:
Silvy
Katrina
Sofia
Ephelis

JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
JF Julian | Collater.al
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InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week

Giulia Guido · 2 weeks ago · Photography

Every day, on our Instagram profile, we ask you to share with us your most beautiful pictures and photographs.
For this InstHunt collection of this week we have selected your 10 best proposals: @laurapasini3, @valerycia, @boryskulikovskyi, @polae.jpg, @paola_francesca_barone, @vrtivstic, @laura.mangelli, @nicole_depergola, @defalcotina, @jesuis_claire.

Tag @collateral.photo to be selected and published on the next InstHunt.

InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
Photography
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
InstHunt – The 10 best photos on Instagram this week
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Why aren’t you here tonight?

Why aren’t you here tonight?

Tommaso Berra · 2 weeks ago · Photography

Impossible to fall asleep, the thought of the other night is pushing in, gripping my stomach with five fingers.
I just wanted to fuck him and now I’m already addicted to the power with which he held my neck. I can still feel the contact between his warm chest and my shivering back, I miss him a little.
There have been nights of which I have confused memories, lost among a thousand useless details, but now I have a clear idea of what I have been denied in this room paved with parquet and adorned with a few plants. I try to fill the lacks, making my body remember gentle gestures, gentle because they seek my lifeblood, they reach up to see the violence of my thoughts.

Paulina Masenina‘s photos are the story, illustrated and written, of an unfulfilled sexual desire. An erotic and desperate journey of a need for mental and physical contact. The bed is still empty, the room desolate, in the head considerations of a night gone wrong: “How many orgasm missed?“, “I can’t breathe thinking of us not fucking in this bed“.

Discover HERE all the shots by Paulina Masenina.

Paulina Masenina | Collater.al
Paulina Masenina | Collater.al
Paulina Masenina | Collater.al
Paulina Masenina | Collater.al
Paulina Masenina | Collater.al
Paulina Masenina | Collater.al
Paulina Masenina | Collater.al
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