The artist who chose Roger Federer for a work at the Venice Biennale

The artist who chose Roger Federer for a work at the Venice Biennale

Tommaso Berra · 1 year ago · Art

It has been four months since Roger Federer‘s last historic match on a tennis court, the doubles match he played with long-time rival Rafael Nadal was followed by big tears rolling down the cheeks of tennis fans around the world, who loved the Swiss’s elegance and celebrated his victories, including 20 slams.
It is easy for fans to remember the Wimbledon victories, but they may have missed RF’s participation in the Venice Biennale, in an installation curated by Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone and displayed in the monumental complex of the Scuola Grande San Giovanni Evangelista.

Rondinone is a friend of Roger Federer and chose the Swiss champion for his work entitled Burn Shine Fly. The work presents a series of sculptures of dancers suspended in the void of the church and coloured like a sky of clouds. The need for harmonious figures capable of inspiring lightness led the artist to choose RF, for his capacity for coordination and elegance in his movements that distinguished him on the playing field.
The artist thus recreated a sculpture with the tennis player’s features and movements, succeeding in bringing back that sensation that seemed to make Roger Federer move on a frictionless surface, a soft layer in which his steps and gestures were always accompanied by an innate grace.
A documentary film captured the collaboration that brought Federer all the way to the Venice Biennale, an environment that he described as being far removed from what he had always done and in which he also felt uneasy. A new thing that the champion commented thus:
This is something exciting in itself because it takes you out of your normal world and catapults you into another world…. But in art, I’m a bit new and I still have so much to learn.”

The artist who chose Roger Federer for a work at the Venice Biennale
Art
The artist who chose Roger Federer for a work at the Venice Biennale
The artist who chose Roger Federer for a work at the Venice Biennale
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The strange restlessness in the works of Victor Castillo

The strange restlessness in the works of Victor Castillo

Tommaso Berra · 1 year ago · Art

They do not look like the kind of cartoon you would show a child, the works of Chilean artist Victor Castillo. It may be because of the characters they represent, who seem to live in a world created on the borderline between innocent play and dark, almost frightening humour.
The characters created by Castillo are figures inspired by the world of comics and graffiti, with citations also to great authors of art history such as Francisco Goya.
The scenes often depict, disguised, fierce criticism of American culture and pop culture products, as well as politics and its decisions that go against certain categories of citizens.

This feeling of strange awe is provided by the contrast between the bright colours typical of cartoons and pop art, and the eerie expressions of little girls with fringes and innocent pigtails. The hollow eyes, the clown nose and the strange stiff smile are the alarm bells of a discourse that Victor Castillo invites us to explore.
Throughout his career Castillo has exhibited in a large number of international galleries; all his work is available on the artist’s IG account.

Victor Castillo | Collater.al
Victor Castillo | Collater.al
Victor Castillo | Collater.al
Victor Castillo | Collater.al
Victor Castillo | Collater.al
Victor Castillo | Collater.al
Victor Castillo | Collater.al
Victor Castillo | Collater.al


The strange restlessness in the works of Victor Castillo
Art
The strange restlessness in the works of Victor Castillo
The strange restlessness in the works of Victor Castillo
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China will host its first exhibition dedicated to street art

China will host its first exhibition dedicated to street art

Tommaso Berra · 1 year ago · Art

There is much discussion about the institutionalisation of street art and the ethical choices of gallery owners and institutions when they choose to present works that belong to an artistic expression that was born in the streets and that, according to the most nostalgic, should not move from those contexts.
In some cases, this conversation poses false problems, which concern the nature of the works and the intentions of the artists themselves, who have been able to adapt their role, and already since the 1970s, by bringing this countercultural phenomenon into traditional art circuits.
There are countries where street art has never entered the galleries in the way that other major museums in the world have done, for example China, which recently announced that it will host its first historical retrospective exhibition dedicated to street art and graffiti, on the occasion of Art Basel Hong Kong.

The title of the exhibition is ‘City as Studio’, representative of the mechanism that has overturned the conception of the artist and the evaluation of this type of art by galleries. A process initiated by artists such as Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring, both of whom are present at the exhibition.
The more than 100 works, created by 30 artists, will be presented at the K11 Art Foundation and have been selected by curator Jeffrey Deitch, a figure who has contributed to the acceptance of street art in the programmes of major museums worldwide thanks to the more than 50 exhibitions he has curated around the world.
“City as Studio” enters the paths of the genre by conveying to visitors the breadth of styles and geographical areas through which different generations have moved. From New York to San Francisco to Brazil, Tokyo and Paris, the exhibition will first and foremost be a historical reflection on graffiti art, thanks to the talents of names such as Fab 5 Freddy , FUTURA, Barry McGee , Mister Cartoon , KAWS and AIKO.

Street Art | Collater.al
China will host its first exhibition dedicated to street art
Art
China will host its first exhibition dedicated to street art
China will host its first exhibition dedicated to street art
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“Dark art with bright colors”: Other World’s Crypto Art

“Dark art with bright colors”: Other World’s Crypto Art

Tommaso Berra · 1 year ago · Art

The landscape of crypto artists is populated, and the name we highlight today is that of Other World, an artist from Los Angeles who manages to define a world that, to use his words, could be described as “psychedelic and surreal”.
The surrealism of his compositions is in the choice of subjects and group scenes, taken from the long tradition of Renaissance and Romantic painting and frescoes, in which historical and religious subjects form large dynamic compositions full of pathos. The psychedelia is linked more to the style with which Other World chooses to cite these references, resorting to highlighter colours completely detached from the background landscapes.

The result that is created is that of a strong contrast both stylistic and thematic, as well as a gloominess that is often given by certain details inserted by the artist such as the destructive fire, the dark skies and the faces of the characters, black with a frightening Venom smile.
To use Other World’s words again, it is “a dark but brightly coloured art”, combining a peculiar technique – a combination of collage and illustration for a digital work – and a high citationism that creates originality in the Crypto Art scene.
The quotation helps the artist not to have to explain too much, not to emphasise the didactic component of the works, leaving the task to the context, the background and gestures that have become familiar thanks to art history. Play and colour are the artist’s share of freedom of interpretation, which he invites us to take, before history and before symbols that are often considered untouchable.

Other World | Collater.al
Other World | Collater.al
Other World | Collater.al
Other World | Collater.al
Other World | Collater.al
“Dark art with bright colors”: Other World’s Crypto Art
Art
“Dark art with bright colors”: Other World’s Crypto Art
“Dark art with bright colors”: Other World’s Crypto Art
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Steffen Kern’s illustrations look like photographs

Steffen Kern’s illustrations look like photographs

Giulia Guido · 1 year ago · Art

Lately in the art world, the theme of deception seems to be a constant. Some photographs look real and instead are made by Artificial Intelligence, amazing places and architectures exist only in the Metaverse, billboards seem to come out of the margins and come at you. It is as if our eyes and minds have to be constantly challenged in order to still be amazed. German artist Steffen Kern also tricks us, but he does so with more ordinary means, ensuring the result. 

Born in 1988, Steffen Kern began his studies in art at a young age and to date counts countless participations in exhibitions and solo shows. His technique is simple enough to leave one bewildered, and the only materials he uses are simple cardboard on which he creates with ink, watercolor and colored pencils

So far, nothing strange, except that every gesture, every pass of color by Steffen Kern is aimed at reproducing the typical elements of analog photographs such as thick grain, flashes of light, particularly marked chiaroscuro. This technique is the real star of his works, which is why the subjects are often common places and objects: a living room, a steak on a frying pan, a bedroom. 

Steffen Kern’s drawings look like photographs and are a beautiful illusion.

Steffen Kern
Steffen Kern
Steffen Kern
Steffen Kern’s illustrations look like photographs
Art
Steffen Kern’s illustrations look like photographs
Steffen Kern’s illustrations look like photographs
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