Our interview with Noyz Narcos for Havana Club’s “Remember Your Origins” campaign

Our interview with Noyz Narcos for Havana Club’s “Remember Your Origins” campaign

Emanuele D'Angelo · 2 years ago · Art

Havana Club, which has always believed in the power of music and the connection it generates between people, even in such a difficult historical moment for the world of entertainment, once again chooses the language of music for the launch of its new campaign “Remember Your Origins”.

A simple and clear claim, which enhances and celebrates the artistic and craft heritage of the street scene to inspire the public and its community with new content.

The campaign comes to life through the collaboration with three leading names of the Italian rap scene: Noyz Narcos, Ketama126 and Speranza. The three artists, or rather the three friends have found themselves on the bars of “Guardami Adesso”. A street hit in their style, raw and original characterized by a beat influenced by the New York drill.

“Guardami Adesso” is a strong song, where Noyz and Speranza go on the attack on the verses while Ketama bursts in with a corrosive and unforgettable refrain. A single that tastes like revenge for the three artists who started from nothing but got to the top only with the strength of their music.

For the occasion we had a chat with Noyz Narcos, to find out more about “Guardami Adesso” and know his next steps.

We are used to hear you on different sounds, which I would define more old school. “Guardami Adesso” on the other hand is a drill track, nice and hard, how did you find yourself in terms of bars and tempos with this genre?

Actually it’s a genre that I follow, I really like it, as soon as it exploded it immediately hit me. Anyway, even if it’s a very different genre from mine, it’s a mega hardcore genre that could be the modern version of what we have always done on other sounds. But in general this kind of approach, a little bit violent, a little bit street for us is congenial, perfect. I wanted to make a drill piece for a long time and in fact this base of Sine was perfect to do it, then Ketama and Speranza are very good on this stuff here.
A perfect formula, I think it was already written that we had to break this base, we wrote it in two hours almost.

Since you’re friends anyway, I won’t ask you what it was like to collaborate with them. I’ll try to stump you with another question, what do you like most about Ketama and Speranza?

What I like about Ketama is that he has the ability to solve things with simplicity that would take me much longer to do. In rap you have to be direct, Ketama has this peculiarity, he can use a simple language and at the same time reach everyone. Then he is also very skilled in melodies, he stands there with his piece of paper, he writes only there Ketama, and he has an incredible ability to find these rhythms, these melodies and even choruses, he is really strong and I know because we have worked together a lot apart from today. Speranza on the other hand, although he’s from another region, although he has a different style than me, he’s still very similar. He’s a killer on the verses, he has a charge of the madonna and always manages to put it in his music. In fact he was the icing on the cake for this single, we needed a tank like him.

Going back to the single again, what is your favorite verse from “Look at Me Now”?

The whole piece, from the chorus to the verse. We created a perfect alchemy, we recorded it and it was already perfect in the sequence, in the timing, in the exchanges, in everything. It’s one of those pieces that when you listen to it again you think it’s perfect like that, you don’t need to do anything else with it.

We close our interview, asking, what will be the next steps of Noyz Narcos? After hearing you in a drill piece can we expect more surprises?

I don’t know, in terms of music production, I’ve stepped out of my comfort zone for a moment. As far as rap is concerned, while I want to experiment, I don’t want to do things to be a phenomenon. I am appreciated for what I do, I prefer to go along that line there. Not that I don’t like experimenting, but it’s not my field of play, drill is another kind of music, I like something else. In the end in my opinion you have to not force your hand and do what you know how to do and as long as you have fun and you like it you do it. I’m not going to do another genre just to please the fans, I don’t care about that anymore.

Our interview with Noyz Narcos for Havana Club’s “Remember Your Origins” campaign
Art
Our interview with Noyz Narcos for Havana Club’s “Remember Your Origins” campaign
Our interview with Noyz Narcos for Havana Club’s “Remember Your Origins” campaign
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The unpublished shots of the great fashion photographer Gian Paolo Barbieri

The unpublished shots of the great fashion photographer Gian Paolo Barbieri

Tommaso Berra · 5 days ago · Photography

Gian Paolo Barbieri is one of the giants of fashion on film, a member of a group of photographers who have been able to depict the world of models, fashion shows and product by going beyond any superficial narrative.
An exhibition by the great master of photography Gian Paolo Barbieri opens in Milan today, Nov. 29, and at the 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS gallery at 13 Via San Vittore, Milan, he will present a series of never-before-seen, full-color works.

© Gian Paolo Barbieri – Laura Alvarez, Venezuela, 1976 – Courtesy of Fondazione Gian Paolo Barbieri : 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS gallery – © Copyright Gian Paolo Barbieri/ Courtesy of Fondazione Gian Paolo Barbieri / 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS gallery

The title of the exhibition is ‘Gian Paolo Barbieri: Unconventional,‘ and it is indeed unconventional how the artist has approached photography and fashion, reworked based on the many experiences and celebrities with whom he has woven relationships and direct contacts.
In the shots of Barbieri, known mainly for his black and white production, provocation and history chase each other, taking up poses from art history, citations to design and architecture, a symbolism that is connoted by an ultra-personal and authentic vision. The new elegance and eroticism that Barbieri has been able to represent in his career can be seen at the 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS gallery, in an exhibition that comes a few days after the cinema release of “L’uomo e la bellezza,” the first docufilm on Gian Paolo Barbieri and already awarded at the Biografilm Festival 2022 in Bologna.

© Copyright Gian Paolo Barbieri/ Courtesy of Fondazione Gian Paolo Barbieri / 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS gallery
© Gian Paolo Barbieri – Eva Herzigova, Roma, 1997 – Courtesy of Fondazione Gian Paolo Barbieri : 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS gallery – © Copyright Gian Paolo Barbieri/ Courtesy of Fondazione Gian Paolo Barbieri / 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS gallery
© Gian Paolo Barbieri – Neith Hunter, Grecia – 1983 – Courtesy of Fondazione Gian Paolo Barbieri : 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS gallery – © Gian Paolo Barbieri – Neith Hunter, Grecia – 1983 – Courtesy of Fondazione Gian Paolo Barbieri : 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS gallery – © Copyright Gian Paolo Barbieri/ Courtesy of Fondazione Gian Paolo Barbieri / 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS gallery
© Gian Paolo Barbieri – Moira O’Brien, Seychelles, 1981 – Courtesy of Fondazione Gian Paolo Barbieri : 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS gallery – © Copyright Gian Paolo Barbieri/ Courtesy of Fondazione Gian Paolo Barbieri / 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS gallery
© Gian Paolo Barbieri – Isa Stoppi in Coppola&Toppo, Milano 1968 – Courtesy of Fondazione Gian Paolo Barbieri : 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS gallery – © Copyright Gian Paolo Barbieri/ Courtesy of Fondazione Gian Paolo Barbieri / 29 ARTS IN PROGRESS gallery
The unpublished shots of the great fashion photographer Gian Paolo Barbieri
Photography
The unpublished shots of the great fashion photographer Gian Paolo Barbieri
The unpublished shots of the great fashion photographer Gian Paolo Barbieri
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Triangle of Sadness in 10 frames  

Triangle of Sadness in 10 frames  

Giulia Guido · 2 days ago · Photography

What happens to society if suddenly the status quo changes? Swedish director Ruben Östlund‘s answer is called Triangle of Sadness. 

Triangle of Sadness was presented during the 75th Cannes Film Festival, where it was awarded the Palme d’Or for best film. Since then its success has crossed all borders. From Sweden to France, from France to the world, abetted by a trailer that in just a few seconds already manages to capture the viewer’s attention and catapult them into this critique of modern society watered by champagne and vomit. 

Carl and Yaya are two models who decide to take a luxury cruise. During the vacation they get to know the other passengers, without ever really relating to them, until at one point the ship sinks and the survivors find themselves on a deserted island. It is at this point that a role reversal begins, and those who were previously at the top of the social pyramid now find themselves having to work for the only people who really know how they can survive in that circumstance. Some will be able to forget the luxury and adapt to the new status quo, others less so, but the more days go by the more the transformation from human to beast takes place. 

Ruben Östlund, however, decides not to take sides and leaves it up to the viewer to decide whether this process of decivilization will be finished or whether there is still hope in human consciousness. 

In sharp contrast to the brutality and cynicism of the plot we find a clean and elegant aesthetic, also the child of the work of Fredrik Wenzel, a Swedish cinematographer who also collaborated with Luca Guadagnino on the miniseries We Are Who We Are. Thus, the more critical the situation becomes the more beautiful the image becomes, mesmerizing the viewer. 

One piece of advice, however, I will leave you with: watching Triangle of Sadness after dinner may not be the best idea. 

Triangle of Sadness in 10 frames  
Photography
Triangle of Sadness in 10 frames  
Triangle of Sadness in 10 frames  
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“The Beauty of Imperfection”-the shots of Alina Gross

“The Beauty of Imperfection”-the shots of Alina Gross

Tommaso Berra · 6 days ago · Photography

The female nude body in the photographic shots of Alina Gross becomes an element far from any erotic representation, or rather the language of photography facilitate the attempt to evoke the ambivalences of sexuality and gender.
The Ukrainian photographer and now based in Germany brings to mind erotic elements through the associations of natural shapes and elements, combining them to create an imperfect beauty, the “Beauty of Imperfection” that is also the title of her latest artbook as well as the project the artist has been pursuing for the past four years.
Alina Gross does not show a univocal beauty – and figure of women – to be told only through traditional canons of beauty, but expands the meaning of forms, thanks also to a pictorial rendering of bodies, aided by the use of color that often sprinkles the skin. The disturbing effect of viewing naked parts is not masked, Gross however invites the viewer to review the mental process of analyzing reality and its definition, which leads to breaking down dizzying barriers.

Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
Alina Gross | Collater.al
“The Beauty of Imperfection”-the shots of Alina Gross
Photography
“The Beauty of Imperfection”-the shots of Alina Gross
“The Beauty of Imperfection”-the shots of Alina Gross
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“Don’t Worry Darling” in 10 frames 

“Don’t Worry Darling” in 10 frames 

Giulia Guido · 1 week ago · Photography

Don’t Worry Darling is one of those cases where one watches the film more out of curiosity than healthy interest. The film, which arrived in theaters last Sept. 22 and was presented at the Venice Film Festival last Sept. 5, began to be talked about long before the trailer, teaser and first photos from the set. 

In fact, the controversies began right at the beginning of filming, when Olivia Wilde, who signs off as director, fired Shia LaBeouf, justifying this decision to the actor’s method of working, which according to Wilde did not fit her modus operandi.
Olivia Wilde’s problems also continued with the leading lady, Florence Pugh, with whom she seems to have had several tensions (never publicly confirmed).
Rounding out this complicated production phase came the director’s choice to replace LaBeouf with then-partner Harry Styles

Inevitably, all these events also took their toll on the promotion phase, which, however, shifted the focus from the actual film to pure gossip. 

A shame? Perhaps not. 

Alice and Jack Chambers are a happily married couple living in Victory, an experimental 1950s community where the men spend all day at work, while the women take care of the house, and then spend their free time with their neighbors. Something suddenly changes, however, and Alice begins to feel constrained in that life, with an increasing desire to discover what lies beyond the city limits. This is the plot, which in itself also hides something potentially interesting, unfortunately it is the development that is lacking. It’s like when teachers in school used to say “he has potential but he doesn’t apply himself.” 

Of all that Don’t Worry Darling puts on the table-which seems more like a need for redemption on Wilde’s part-something is saved and it is the reason why the film lets you watch it to the end: the aesthetics

In fact, the director used the work of Matthew Libatique, an American cinematographer and regular collaborator of Darren Aronofsky, to take care of the photography. In nearly three decades of work, Libatique has handled the cinematography for such films as Requiem for a Dream and The Black Swan, experience that led him to be prepared for the eerie reality brought to the big screen in Don’t Worry Darling. It is immediately noticeable how the warm light that illuminates the entire town becomes cold and gloomy when Alice is alone with herself, and becomes colder and colder as time passes. The use of light, then, goes hand in hand with the colors of the places: for example, the bathroom tiles are green, reminiscent of hospital uniforms. 

For this reason, it was particularly difficult to select only 10 frames from the film, which perhaps focused heavily on aesthetics and too little on content. 

“Don’t Worry Darling” in 10 frames 
Photography
“Don’t Worry Darling” in 10 frames 
“Don’t Worry Darling” in 10 frames 
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